Skip to content

A Month in Special Collections: April

May 2, 2016
  • Click to enlarge image and access links

monthlyreview

 

 

 

 

 

Related Links:

Names and Places of UTSA: Tomás Rivera (revisited)

April 24, 2016

This month we continue “Names and Places of UTSA,” a blog series on university history, with a post by archives student assistant, Marissa Del Toro. This month’s blog post returns to an influential figure within UTSA’s early history, Tomás Rivera, who was covered in an earlier post.

Portraits of Dr. Tomás Rivera, 1976.

Portraits of Dr. Tomás Rivera, 1976. Photo source: Gil Barrera Photographs of the University of Texas at San Antonio, MS 27, UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

This remembrance of Tomás Rivera begins with a personal anecdote from my childhood in California. Since 1986, my mother has worked at the University of California, Riverside (UCR), so my sisters and I became acquainted with the campus from a very early age. On special occasions my father would bring us to the campus to visit her at work. Our visits to UCR were a treat for my sisters and me, as we were also given the chance to stop by the library and choose a book to read while we waited for our mom to get off work. Now this may not seem much but this library, the Tomás Rivera Library, became a sacred space for me as I grew up; it was an escape from some of the harsh realities of life. The tall white arches leading to the building’s entrance were a gateway to another world for my sisters and me.

Later on when I attended UCR as an undergraduate, the Tomás Rivera Library became a different haven for me. It became a space of learning, hanging out, and of course the magical environment for overnight study sessions. When I came to UTSA in 2013, I was surprised—but excited—to see the Tomás Rivera Center (TRC) here on campus. I learned that the TRC was an on-campus site for student tutoring services; the center has even assisted me with my Master’s thesis, giving me the guidance and tools to become a better writer. I viewed Tomás Rivera’s presence here as a sign of good luck for my time at UTSA.

Tomás Rivera Library

Tomás Rivera Library at University of California, Riverside. Photo source: UCR Today.

While I knew some biographical information about Rivera, I did not fully understand the extent of his legacy that existed in California, Texas, and the United States. Tomás Rivera was a professor, poet, author, scholar, and activist who led an impressive life before his untimely death in 1984 at the age of forty-nine. His story begins in 1935 in Crystal City, Texas, where he was born to a migrant Mexican-American family. During his youth, Rivera became an avid reader while he was on the road with his family following the migrant stream of work from Texas to the Midwest. Despite the harsh circumstances of poverty, constantly moving, and working from a young age, Rivera became a successful student with a strong interest in writing.

In 1954 Rivera graduated from Crystal City High School and attended Southwest Texas State College (now known as Texas State University). By 1964 he had received his Bachelor’s degree in English with minors in Spanish, History, and Education, and a Master’s Degree in Education. He continued his studies at the University of Oklahoma, and by 1969 had completed his PhD in Romance Languages and Literature, as well as a second Master’s Degree in Spanish Literature. While earning his advanced degrees, Rivera impressively managed to teach both Spanish and English at schools in League City, Crystal City, and San Antonio, Texas.

In an interview with his wife Concepción “Concha” Rivera, whom he married in 1952, she notes that Rivera encountered difficulty in finding work as an English teacher in 1950s and 1960s America. She attributed this to the prejudicial belief that “they weren’t going to hire a Hispanic to teach English.” She recalled that moment as when Rivera decided to receive additional degrees in Spanish so he could find work more easily.

Tomás Rivera : eight youth portraits

Composite photograph of school portraits and group snapshot from early teaching jobs. Photo source: UCR_TR_EC_3, The Tomás Rivera Archive Catalog, UC Riverside, University Archives.

From 1971–1973, Rivera was Director in the Division of Foreign Languages, Literature and Linguistics, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and Professor of Spanish Literature at UTSA. He was invited to campus at the request of the first president, Arleigh B. Templeton, after they had previously worked together at Sam Houston State University. Mrs. Rivera recalls her husband’s integral role in the early planning stages of UTSA, since he was only one of five people developing the curriculum and academic blueprints for the new university.

Afterwards from 1973–1976, Rivera became Associate Dean of the College of Multidisciplinary Studies and continued as Professor of Spanish at UTSA. He would eventually become Vice President for Administration at UTSA before leaving in 1978 to become the Executive Vice President and Acting Vice President for Academic Affairs at the University of Texas at El Paso.

FromTheSearchersByTomasRivera

Back page of the program from Tomás Rivera’s memorial service, 1984. Source: UTSA Library Office of the Dean Records, UA 5.01, UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

A year later in 1979, Rivera became Chancellor at the University of California, Riverside, as well as Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures. This was a momentous occasion in his life—and for U.S. and California history—as Rivera became the first Mexican-American to hold such a position within the University of California system. Mrs. Rivera noted that she once told him that, “You’re still a migrant worker. You keep moving every two years.” However, UC Riverside would be Rivera’s final position before his untimely death in 1984.

Rivera lived a short life but he accomplished a great deal. Besides teaching, he was appointed by both Presidents Carter and Reagan to serve on the Commission of Higher Education. He also served as a board member for the Carnegie Institute, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the Educational Testing Service of Princeton, New Jersey, and the board of directors of the Times-Mirror Company.

In addition to being a successful educator and administrator, Rivera was also a gifted writer who wrote from the personal yet powerful experiences of his life. He wrote several prose pieces, poems, and essays on literature and higher education. Rivera even contributed to El Grito: A Journal of Contemporary Mexican-American Thought, a journal founded by Octavio Romano and Nick Vaca at the height of the 1960s Chicano Literary Renaissance. From its opening in 1967 until its closure in 1974, the El Grito provided an essential outlet for Chicano writers who found difficulty getting their work published in mainstream publications.

Rivera’s most well-known work is his 1971 novel, Y no se lo tragó la tierra: And the earth did not part. This semi-biographical book of poems, which earned him the prestigious Quinto Sol Literary Award in 1971, reflects the stories of his migrant upbringing and the community he belonged to. Rivera’s powerful words reveal the world he existed in but also the formation of his identity as he encountered the harsh and sometimes unfair elements of life: alienation, exploitation, racism, love, family, community, death, and resurrection. At UTSA, our Rare Books collection holds several of his published works including, This migrant earth (1987) as well as Y no se lo tragó la tierra: And the earth did not part.

UTSA Bulletin, Vol. 1, No. 1, Page 4, 1973.

UTSA Bulletin, Vol. 1, No. 1, Page 4, 1973. Source: UTSA University Publications Collection, UA 1.02, UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Rivera’s legacy reveals him to be a dedicated individual who broke down barriers and established new opportunities for Mexican-Americans, Chicanxs, Latinxs, and Hispanics through his numerous accomplishments. In a 1981 interview, Rivera noted that his success was due in part to his parents and his family’s encouragement. Following the support he received growing up, he inspired others to “maximize education as much as possible.” He viewed education as a sense of power and strength that creates more possibilities and better visions for a future. Rivera was a humble person but also tremendously insightful. He once said: “Have a very strong love for each other as people. Help the less fortunate. Develop a stronger consciousness of what you are and how you can help each other.”

The memory of Tomás Rivera lives on in the numerous plazas, buildings, research centers, and schools named in his honor. These sites offer thousands of individuals who walk through their doorways a welcoming and supportive environment, as seen in the Tomás Rivera Library at UCR and the Tomás Rivera Center (TRC) at UTSA. My experiences at these places—as a child, an undergraduate, and a graduate student—are a testament to his legacy. Rivera’s life stands as an influential model for my young brown life, and for many others as well.

Tomás with his family.

Tomás with his family. Photo source: UCR_TR_EC_2, The Tomás Rivera Archive Catalog, UC Riverside, University Archives.

 

Bibliography

Handbook of Texas Online, R. R. Hinojosa-Smith, “Rivera, Tomas,” accessed April 11, 2016, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fri34.

Meier, Matt S., and Margo Gutiérrez. “The Mexican American Experience.” 2003. Accessed April 11, 2016. https://books.google.com/books?id=-E1_hLqmUCIC.

Rivera, Concepcion Concha, and Jan Erickson. “Transcription of Oral History Interview with CONCEPCION G. RIVERA.” Transcription of Oral History Interview with CONCEPCION G. RIVERA. August 13, 1998. Accessed April 11, 2016. http://www.ucrhistory.ucr.edu/pdf/rivera.pdf.

“Rivera’s UCR Curriculum Vitae, 1984.” Tomás Rivera archive, Collection 253. University of California, Riverside Libraries, Special Collections & Archives, University of California, Riverside. 1992. Accessed April 11, 2016. http://www.oac.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/hb567nb5kv/?brand=oac4.

Tomás Rivera archive, Collection 253. University of California, Riverside Libraries, Special Collections & Archives, University of California, Riverside. Accessed April 11, 2016. http://www.oac.cdlib.org/findaid/ark:/13030/tf6r29p0kq&brand=oac4/

Salazar, Veronica. Dedication Rewarded, Volume 2. San Antonio, TX: Mexican American Cultural Center, 1981.

“Tomás Rivera.” Tomás Rivera Center. 2016. Accessed April 11, 2016. http://www.utsa.edu/trcss/TomasRivera.html.

Battle of Flowers Parade Postcards

April 15, 2016

In 1900, less than ten years after the first Battle of Flowers Parade, book store owner Nic Tengg began advertising tissue paper and other material for use in decorating entries for the parade, the primary event of Spring Carnival (now Fiesta San Antonio). A few years later, on April 14, 1907, he placed an advertisement in the San Antonio Light listing an expanded inventory of carnival goods, including festooning, welcoming flags, confetti, whistles, and “Battle of Flowers Parade Post Cards.”  The postcards were produced by the British firm of Rafael Tuck and Sons in London.

The Tuck firm was one of the most well-known during the “postcard boom” in the early 1900s. Before issuing the Battle of Flowers series, they produced a set of color postcards of San Antonio street scenes. About 1905, Tengg also published a set of postcards with black and white halftone views taken by local photographers. It isn’t known if Tengg encouraged the Tucks to produce the Battle of Flowers series.

The set of eight cards are each labeled “Oilette,” a trade name used by Tuck for postcards reproduced from paintings. The Battle of Flowers cards were among the first to have divided backs that allowed users to write messages on the address side of a postcard.

Special Collections has a complete set of the Battle of Flowers Parade postcards, all donated by Marie Whitehead. Each was mailed separately in April 1907 to Mrs. Whitehead’s aunt, Ida Schaefer, residing temporarily in Galveston and not able to attend the parade.

 

Swan car with fanciful background. (MS 362: 097-0902)

Swan car with background depicting a residential neighborhood.  (MS 362: 097-0902)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Texas Flag and Spring Carnival Flag. (MS 362: 097-0901)

Texas Flag and Spring Carnival Flag. (MS 362: 097-0901)

Joske Brother’s entry in the Battle of Flowers Parade in 1904. It is likely that all the postcard paintings of the parade were based on photographs such as this one, which was among the photographic views of San Antonio sold in a photographic supply shop on Alamo Plaza. (MS 362: 101-0089)

Joske Brother’s entry in the Battle of Flowers Parade in 1904. It is likely that all the postcard depictions of the parade were based on photographs such as this one, which was among the photographic views of San Antonio sold in a photographic supply shop on Alamo Plaza in the early 1900s. (MS 362: 101-0089)

Tuck and Sons used artistic license to transport Joske’s float from a street outside a boarding house to a better location directly in front of the Alamo. (MS 362: 097-0904)

Tuck and Sons used artistic license to transport Joske’s float from a street outside a rooming house to a better location directly in front of the Alamo. (MS 362: 097-0904)

Float representing a boat in the Spanish American War. In the background is the Federal Courthouse and Post Office on the north side of Alamo Plaza. (MS 362: 097-0903)

Float representing a boat in the Spanish American War. In the background is the Federal Courthouse and Post Office on the north side of Alamo Plaza. (MS 362: 097-0903)

Men in automobile on the south side of the park in Alamo Plaza. The artist replaced the trees with dense shrubbery. (MS 362: 097-0905)

Men in automobile on the south side of the park in Alamo Plaza. The artist replaced the trees with dense shrubbery. (MS 362: 097-0905)

Parade entry inspired by a theatrical production of the time. (MS 362: 097-0906)

Parade entry inspired by a theatrical production of the time. (MS 362: 097-0906)

One of the many automobiles and carriages entered by their owners. (MS 362: 097-0907)

One of the many decorated automobiles entered by individuals. (MS 362: 097-0907)

State and Spring Carnival flags against background of a fireworks exhibition, held at San Pedro Park baseball field during Carnival Week. (MS 362: 097-0900)

State and Spring Carnival flags against background of a fireworks exhibition, held at San Pedro Park baseball field during Carnival Week. (MS 362: 097-0900)

 

Special Collections Seeking Summer Student Clerks – 3 available positions

April 8, 2016

IMG_7989UTSA Libraries Special Collections is seeking three student clerks for the summer.  Positions are located at both UTSA’s Main Campus and the HemisFair Park/Institute of Texan Cultures Campus downtown. 

Interested students may apply by submitting a resume and cover letter indicating which position(s) they wish to be considered for to specialcollections@utsa.edu.

_____________________________________________________________

Job Title: Southwest Voter Registration Education Project Student Clerk (Reporting to Project Archivist)

Location: Main Campus, ITC occasionally

Start Date: 6/1/2016

Student employees must be enrolled on a half-time or greater basis during the current or next scheduled semester.

Job Description: With training from the Project Archivist the student will carry out tasks relating to the processing, digitization, and paper conservation of the Southwest Voter Registration Education Project Records. Activities include uploading digitized audio and video to digital collections portal; editing and creating descriptions for audio and video; assisting with map flattening; and other duties as determined. Student may work on other collections if needed.

Qualifications: Graduate student preferred. May consider undergraduates with demonstrated relevant library or museum experience. Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Ability to work under minimal supervision. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel, scanners and image editing software a plus. Spanish language literacy preferred.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours, Monday-Friday.

Hours per Week: 15

Wage: $9/hr.

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter or any questions regarding the position to Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu.

_________________________________________________________________

Job Title: Student Clerk (reporting to University Archivist)

Location: HemisFair Park Campus/ITC (downtown San Antonio) and Main Campus

Start Date: 6/1/2016

Student employees must be enrolled on a half-time or greater basis during the current or next scheduled semester.

Job Description: With training from the University Archivist, carry out basic tasks in the Special Collections department. Activities may include scanning and entering metadata for photograph or digital collections; re-housing and creating inventories of collections; and other duties as determined.

Qualifications: Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Some lifting required. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel, scanners and image editing software a plus. Preferred candidates will be able to work at both our HemisFair Park Campus in the Institute of Texan Cultures (801 E. César E. Chávez Blvd.) in downtown San Antonio and our Main Campus locations.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours, Monday-Friday.

Hours per Week: 15

Wage: $9/hr.

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter or any questions regarding the position to Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu.

________________________________________________________________

Job Title: Student Clerk (Reporting to Digital Archivist)

Location: Main Campus, multiple locations

Start Date: 6/1/2016

Student employees must be enrolled on a half-time or greater basis during the current or next scheduled semester.

Job Description:  With training from the Digital Archivist the student will carry out tasks relating to preservation and access of digital archival materials. Activities may include editing and creating descriptive and/or technical metadata; uploading digital objects to our online access system; creating inventories of digital collections; managing project documentation; and other duties as determined.  This position will also be heavily involved in creating descriptive information for our San Antonio Light Photographs Collection.

Qualifications: Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Ability to work under minimal supervision. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold. Familiarity with Microsoft Excel/Access preferred.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours, Monday-Friday.

Hours per Week: 15

Wage: $9/hr.

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter or any questions regarding the position to Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu.

________________________________________________________________

 

 

Necessary Work: Bryce Milligan’s World of Words and Design” Exhibit to open April 9

April 4, 2016

 

Brycewebimage_2Over the last few weeks, UTSA’s Rare Books Librarian, Agnieszka Czeblakow has been working with Bryce Milligan and Bihl House Arts on an exhibit featuring books designed and produced by Milligan under the auspices of Wings Press. The exhibit,  Necessary Work: Bryce Milligan’s World of Words and Design” opens with a reception, which is free and open to the public, at Bihl Haus Arts on Saturday, April 9, from 6 to 9 pm.  The evening includes poolside jazz by George & Aaron Prado, libations and light hors d’oeuvres.

In addition, on Saturday, April 23, 2-4 PM, Bihl Haus will host a panel discussion “Independent Publishing and Book Design” with Bryce Milligan (publisher, editor, designer, Wings Press), Rosemary Catacalos (Poet Laureate of Texas, author of two fine press chapbooks), Roberto Bonazzi (publisher, Latitudes Press), and Dave Oliphant (publisher, Prickly Pear Press). Moderated by Agnieszka Czeblakow, Rare Books Librarian, UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

The exhibit, which kicks off National Poetry Month, highlights the importance of the cover designs, colors, bindings, papers, and threads, and invites the viewer to think about the books and their physical attributes and visual elements as complex objects imbued with meaning, cultural ideals and aesthetics of a particular time and place. It features books, archival materials such as photographs, correspondence and original artwork, which illuminate the myriad processes and decisions that go into designing and producing a book. From choosing letterpress or laser printing, selecting handmade papers and folding them into “signatures” to sewing, stapling or gluing the books together, the design process reflects the necessary work that goes into the creation of an object, which, in readers’ hands becomes “a coalescence of human intentions,”* beyond that of simple utilitarianism or commercial considerations.”

Wings Press began in 1975 as “an informal association of artists and cultural mythologists dedicated to the preservation of the Literature of Texas.” Managed by Joannie Whitebird and Joseph F. Lomax, the small, independent press, first based in Houston, published collections of poetry, works of music, fiction, and history.  Upon Lomax’s death, in the early 80s, Whitebird took over Wings’ editorial and publishing duties and ran the press until 1995, when, with her health in decline, she sold it to Bryce Milligan for $100 and an oath sealed with a bloody handshake to “keep the press going.”

Since 1995, Milligan has published 200 books ranging from small, handmade chapbooks to 600-page hardbacks, as well as ebooks. Sharing Whitebirds’s vision of “small press as an agent of change through literature,” Milligan continues to publish multi-cultural books of poetry, fiction, drama, history, young adult and children’s literature, as well as broadsides, anthologies, textbooks and musical recordings. The Wings Press roster includes national and international award-winning poets and writers as well as regional and national poet laureates. However, the Press continues to publish works of little known writers across all of the Americas. The Wings Press mission statement, printed in every book, says: “We believe that good writing is innovative, insightful, and interesting. But most of all it is honest. As Bob Dylan put it, ‘To live outside the law, you must be honest’.”

Bryce Milligan is the author of five collections of poetry, Daysleepers & Other Poems (1984), Litany Sung at Hell’s Gate (1991), From Inside the Tree (1990), Working the Stone (1994), Alms for Oblivion ( 2003) and Lost and Certain of It (2006). Milligan is also the author of four historical novels and short story collections for young adults, beginning with With the Wind, Kevin Dolan (1987), which received the Texas Library Association’s “Lone Star Book for Young Adults” award. Other works for young adults include Battle of the Alamo (1990), Comanche Captive (1990) and Lawmen: Stories of Men Who Tamed the West (1994).He is also the author of five regionally produced plays and well over 2,000 articles, essays, and reviews. He was the book critic for the San Antonio Express-News from 1982 to 1987, and for the San Antonio Light from 1987 to 1990.

The founding editor of Pax: A Journal for Peace through Culture (1983-1987) and Vortex: A Critical Review (1986-1990), he became in 1995 the publisher/editor of Wings Press, one of the oldest continually operating small presses in Texas. In 1985, Milligan co-founded (with Sandra Cisneros) the Annual Texas Small Press Bookfair, which evolved into the San Antonio Inter-American Book Fair. Milligan was the director of the literature program at the Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center in San Antonio in 1986, and from 1994 to 2000. Milligan has taught at UTSA and Palo Alto college and as poet-in-the-schools with San Antonio ISD, and directed the only 4-year high school creative writing program in the country.

Bryce Milligan‘s collection documenting his  work in San Antonio’s literary community is housed at UTSA Libraries Special Collections, and portions of it has been digitized.  Included in the collection are manuscripts, drafts, galley proofs and correspondence related to Milligan’s many book and journal projects. The San Antonio Inter-American Book Fair and Latina Letters conference are represented through planning materials and correspondence. Also included are poetry, articles, chapbooks, newsletters, scrapbooks,  and assorted digital media.

* Michael F. Suarez, Director of Rare Book School, Professor of English, University Professor and Honorary Curator of Special Collections at the University of Virginia.

Women’s History Month panel-UTSA Special Collections Women’s Archives

March 28, 2016

PNB stacks 2On Thursday, March 24, 2016 as part of Women’s History Month, UTSA Special Collections participated in a panel discussion on UTSA Women’s Archives and the development of Women’s History Month.

Panelists spoke about the importance of preserving women’s history through unique archival collections, how collections can be used by researchers, future plans for growth of UTSA women’s history collections, and the evolution and planning of Women’s History Month over the years.

The panel was comprised of Amy Rushing, head of Special Collections, Melissa Gohlke, Assistant Archivist with Special Collections, Dr. Kirsten Gardner, Associate Professor of History at UTSA, and Ms. Luz Elena Solis Day, Mexican American Business and Professional Women’s Association.

Following the panel presentation, Amy Rushing and Ms. Solis Day engaged in a ceremonial signing over of the Mexican American Business and Professional Women’s Association records to UTSA Special Collections for preservation.

MABPWA logo

The Mexican-American Business and Professional Women’s Association (MABPW) was chartered in August of 1972 with 29 members. They are a nonsectarian, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization. MABPW is affiliated with the Texas and National Federations of Business & Professional Women’s Clubs, Inc. They use education and public engagement as vehicles to promote awareness of issues of equal pay for women, women’s rights, and health care concerns. They also work to help the San Antonio community by sponsoring and participating in local events year-round. MABPW donated their organizational records to UTSA Special Collections in 2015. The collection contains correspondence, meeting minutes, programs, yearbooks, photographs, newspaper articles, and other materials that document the activity of the club from its inception to the early 2000’s.

 

UTSA Libraries Special Collections receives Brewster Photograph Collection

March 18, 2016

Realtor Robert A. Coker recently donated the photograph collection of life-long San Antonio resident Olive Nesbitt Brewster, daughter of Charles H. Brewster (1886-1955) and Olive Nesbitt Brewster (1888-1986). The collection (MS 458) contains studio portraits and snapshots of the Nesbitt and Brewster families, dating from the 1880s to the 1980s. Ms. Brewster had moved to a nursing home and the photographs were among the items left behind when the house was placed on the market. Many people would have discarded them. But Mr. Coker realized the documentary value of the collection and placed them with us so that researchers could benefit from them.

Among the late 19th century portraits in the collection are the work of San Antonio commercial photographers David P. Barr, Asa A. Brack, and Alonzo N. Callaway. But of greater interest to cultural historians are the Kodak snapshots taken by Charles and Olive Brewster and their friends, beginning around 1910. They show outings to parks in San Antonio and nearby towns. The couple’s photos record the period of their courtship and early years of their marriage, including numerous photographs of their first child, Charles Jr., at home and on family excursions. Continuing the custom of carrying a camera, the couple’s daughter, also named Olive Nesbitt Brewster, took pictures of her recreational activities. Collectively, these images help us understand the way previous generations spent their leisure time in South Central Texas.

These are a few of the photographs from the Brewster family albums.

Charles H. Brewster and Olive Nesbitt pose among the banana trees and elephant ears in Landa Park, New Braunfels, circa 1910. (MS458: 115-0371)

Charles H. Brewster and Olive Nesbitt pose among the banana trees and elephant ears in Landa Park, New Braunfels, circa 1910. (MS458: 115-0371)

 

 

Olive Nesbitt (center, wearing dark bow tie) with friends on the banks of the Guadalupe River near New Braunfels, circa 1910. (MS458: 115-0367)

Olive Nesbitt (center, wearing dark bow tie) with friends on the banks of the Guadalupe River near New Braunfels, circa 1910. (MS458: 115-0367)

Olive Nesbitt (right) and a friend on a ride in Electric Park, West Evergreen Street at San Pedro Creek, San Antonio, circa 1910. (MS458: 115-0360)

Olive Nesbitt (right) and a friend on a ride in Electric Park, West Evergreen Street at San Pedro Creek, San Antonio, circa 1910. (MS458: 115-0360)

Charles H. Brewster and Olive Nesbitt in the limestone quarry that later became the site of the San Antonio Zoo, circa 1910. (MS458: 115-0360)

Charles H. Brewster and Olive Nesbitt in the limestone quarry that later became the site of the San Antonio Zoo, circa 1910. (MS458: 115-0360)

Olive and Charles Brewster proudly pose with their son, Charles H. Brewster, Jr., on the front porch of their home at 102 Vitra Place, San Antonio, 1913. (MS458: 115-0336)

Olive and Charles Brewster proudly pose with their son, Charles H. Brewster, Jr., on the front porch of their home at 102 Vitra Place, San Antonio, 1913. (MS458: 115-0336)

Charles H. Brewster, Jr. sits at the edge of the San Antonio River, July 1914. (MS458: 115-0345)

Charles H. Brewster, Jr. sits at the edge of the San Antonio River, July 1914. (MS458: 115-0345)

Charles H. Brewster, Jr., is introduced to croquet by a friend on a farm near Lockhart, ca. 1914. (MS458: 115-0390)

Charles H. Brewster, Jr., is introduced to croquet by a friend on a farm near Lockhart, circa 1914. (MS458: 115-0390)

“Dutch,” a family friend, in his car “Pathfinder” on a road in the Texas Hill Country, 1916. (MS458: 115-0443)

“Dutch,” a family friend, in his car “Pathfinder” on a road in the Texas Hill Country, 1916. (MS458: 115-0443)

Caravan from San Antonio arrives at a campground at Junction, 1927. (MS458: 115-0400)

Caravan from San Antonio arrives at a campground at Junction, 1927. (MS458: 115-0400)

Friends of Charles H. Brewster, Sr., play poker at a camp in the Texas Hill Country, circa 1940. (MS458: 115-420)

Friends of Charles H. Brewster, Sr., play poker at a camp in the Texas Hill Country, circa 1940. (MS458: 115-420)

Olive N. Brewster II stopped to take this picture of her friends while bicycling through Brackenridge Park, San Antonio, circa 1942. (MS458: 115-0414)

Olive N. Brewster II stopped to take this picture of her friends while bicycling through Brackenridge Park, San Antonio, circa 1942. (MS458: 115-0414)

 

 

%d bloggers like this: