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Remembering Peter T. Flawn

May 8, 2017
President Peter T. Flawn

President Flawn, June 15, 1973. Source: MS 27, Gil Barrera Photographs of the University of Texas at San Antonio.

We were sad to hear that UTSA’s second President, Peter Tyrrell Flawn, passed away Sunday at age 91. Originally from Miami, he served in the Army Air Corps in WWII. He studied at Oberlin College and received his doctorate in geology from Yale University. Dr. Flawn taught geology at UT Austin before joining UTSA in 1973.

His presidency from 1973-1977 was a critical time in UTSA’s history. During his tenure the first classes were held (1973), the first commencement ceremony occurred (1974), Main Campus opened (1975), and the university achieved full accreditation for its graduate programs by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.

Flawn later served as UT Austin’s President, from 1979-1985, and again as interim President in 1997-1998. In 2012 the UTSA Science Building was re-named the Peter T. Flawn Building in his honor.

A Month in Special Collections: April

May 1, 2017
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Special Collections Student Clerk Positions Available for Summer 2017

April 16, 2017

UTSA Libraries Special Collections is seeking 3 student clerks for the summer semester. Positions are located at UTSA’s main campus and the HemisFair Park/Institute of Texan Cultures Campus downtown

UTSA Main Campus Library 11-25-15

Interested students may apply by submitting a resume and cover letter indicating which position(s) they wish to be considered for to specialcollections@utsa.edu.


 

Job Title: Student Clerk (reporting to the Manuscripts Archivist)

Location: Main Campus and Hemisfair Campus/ITC (downtown San Antonio)

Start Date: 6/1/2017 (position is for summer only)

Student employees must be enrolled on a half-time or greater basis during the semester of employment.

Duties and Responsibilities: With training from the Manuscripts Archivist, carry out basic tasks in the Special Collections department. Activities may include re-housing and creating inventories of collections, photocopying and scanning, creating and entering metadata for digital collections, assisting with exhibit preparations, and other duties as determined.

Qualifications: Graduate student preferred. May consider undergraduates with demonstrated relevant experience. Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Ability to work under minimal supervision. Some lifting of boxes required. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold. Familiarity with scanners, image editing software, and Microsoft Excel a plus. Neat handwriting is required.

Work will primarily be performed at Main Campus, but availability to work occasional hours at Hemisfair Campus/ITC (801 E. César E. Chávez Blvd.) in downtown San Antonio is desirable.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours, Monday-Friday

Hours per Week: 15

Wage: $10/hr

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter or any questions regarding the position to Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu

 


 

Job Title: Student Clerk (reporting to University Archivist)

Location: Main Campus and HemisFair Park Campus/ITC (downtown San Antonio)

Start Date: 6/1/2017

Student employees must be enrolled on a half-time or greater basis during the current or next scheduled semester.

Duties and Responsibilities: With training from the University Archivist, carry out basic tasks in the Special Collections department. Activities may include re-housing and creating inventories of collections, photocopying and scanning, creating and entering metadata for digital collections, assisting with exhibit preparations and social media posts, and other duties as determined.

Qualifications: Graduate student preferred. May consider undergraduates with demonstrated relevant experience. Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Ability to work under minimal supervision. Some lifting of boxes required. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold. Familiarity with scanners, image editing software, and Microsoft Excel a plus. Neat handwriting is required.

Preferred candidates will be able to work at both our HemisFair Park Campus in the Institute of Texan Cultures (801 E. César E. Chávez Blvd.) in downtown San Antonio and our Main Campus locations.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours, Monday-Friday.

Hours per Week: 15

Wage: $10/hr.

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter or any questions regarding the position to Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu.

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Job Title: Student Clerk (Reporting to Rare Books Librarian)

Location: Main Campus, John Peace Library

Job Description: With training from the Rare Books Librarian the student will carry out basic tasks in the Special Collections department. Activities may include paging, photocopying, and re-shelving materials; cleaning, processing, and re-housing incoming materials; assisting with collection preservation/conservation (Paper repairs, creating protective enclosures and mylar jackets), and other duties as determined.

Qualifications: Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Manual dexterity.  Some lifting required. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold needed. Familiarity with Library of Congress subject headings.  Experience with scanners and image editing software a plus.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours, Monday-Friday.

Hours per Week: 15

Wage: $10/hr.

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter or any questions regarding the position to Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu.

 

Fiesta Preparations

April 7, 2017

Fiesta San Antonio 2017 opens in a few days.  Final preparations for the numerous events are underway.  Beginning in the 1920s, photographers for the San Antonio Light and San Antonio Express-News newspapers routinely documented behind-the-scenes activities such as building parade floats, setting up booths, and performance practice sessions.  Usually these images were taken to advertise events.  But in some cases, photographs were taken to apprise readers of the tremendous work involved in staging the annual celebration.  Likewise, some of the photos were published as a tribute to certain individuals such as Minna Bel Oland, Cora Watson, and brothers Emile and Marcel Robin, who were involved in the preparation of Fiesta events for several decades.

These are some of the photographs showing pre-Fiesta activities, dating from the 1920s to 1990.

Velma Wolfe, seamstress at Southwestern Decorators, repairs tattered Fiesta flags and banners, April 1938.  (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-1778-N)

 

Minna Bel Oland stands beside her assistants as they prepare a train for a duchess in the Coronation of the Queen of the Order of the Alamo, April 1951.  (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-4179-C)

Duchesses practice the formal court bow for the Order of the Alamo’s Court of the Golden Journey, Ruth Matlock Dance Studio, April 11, 1958.  (San Antonio Express-News Photograph Collection, E-0004-064-01)

Girls rehearse the Blue Danube Scarf Dance for Fiesta Water Ballet, held at San Pedro Park, April 1926.  (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-0564-A)

Patsy Ann Rolley and Stanley Ketchum pose in their Minnie and Mickey Mouse costumes at rehearsal for Children’s Dance Fete, featuring pupils from local dance studios, April 1936. (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-0970-A)

Members of the Herman Cepler Family, a local aerialist troupe, rehearse their routine for a series of high-wire shows on Alamo Plaza, April 1955. (San Antonio Express-News Photograph Collection, E-0004-064-01)

Barge for Texas Cavalier’s River Parade is lowered to the river from the Market Street Bridge, April 3, 1962.  (San Antonio Express-News Photograph Collection, E-0008-088-06)

Cora Watson examines one of the 15,000 paper flowers that she and a group of 20 assistants pieced together to decorate floats for the Battle of Flowers Parade, April 1938.  (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-1544-S)

Kalista Hart, chairman of the queens’ section of the Battle of Flowers Association, holds drawings and fabric swatches as she coordinates color schemes with Emile Robin (left) and Marcel Robin, designers and builders of the royalty parade floats, April 1951.  (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-4058-D)

Floyd Arrowood, city policeman, inspects one of the ten telephones installed near the courthouse and city hall to aid in policing the carnival, April 1940. (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-2434-E)

Group unloads cushions for parade bleachers along Broadway, April 1937. (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-1559-AAA)

San Antonio Conservation Society volunteers make crepe paper flowers to decorate booths at A Night in Old San Antonio (NIOSA), April 12, 1990. (San Antonio Light Photograph Collection, MS 359: L-7286-027-18)

Vendor sets up a rack of inflatable toys at Fiesta Carnival outside City Hall, April 1988. (San Antonio Express-News Photograph Collection, EN1988-04-14-02)

A Month in Special Collections: March

April 6, 2017
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MarchBlog

SVREP Collection: Spring Student Clerk Experience

March 27, 2017

This post was written by Meghan McCarthy, our student clerk for the SVREP Collection. 

For the last few months, I have had the honor of helping archive some very rich and exciting history. When I first applied for the Student Clerk position with Special Collections in early December, I wasn’t sure what to expect. I was taking a Women and Gender in Latin America class with Dr. Catherine Komisaruk when she sent me an email suggesting that the position was something I try for. I was very excited from the beginning, as I had loved the few times I had gotten to see materials in different classes from Special Collections and it was something I was considering for my future professional life as a history major. I had also previously worked as an Administrative Assistant at The Playhouse San Antonio and was fortunate enough to help them archive a lot of their documents and photographs there which I loved doing. When I got the email to attend an interview, I was so nervous, but upon arriving, the whole staff was so kind and engaging and it seemed like the type of place I would love to work. It wasn’t long after that I found out I received the job. I was thrilled! It isn’t often that someone gets a job that involves their field of study while they’re still in school, so I felt so grateful.

 

Showing up on my first day, I sat down with Leah and she gave me a rundown on what I would be doing here at Special Collections. Realizing the extent to which I would be working with the Southwest Voters and Willie Velasquez documents was incredible! I have been focusing broadly on Borderland Metropolitan history and more specifically San Antonio history and felt that this archival experience would be so invaluable to my studies. I also felt the pressure of really doing this right for researchers who would view and use these important documents in the future. To get started, I first did my own research on SVREP, as well as Willie Velasquez which gave me a greater sense of how to file the documents and who were the big names and what were the big events in SVREP’s history. I then began the filing process. The first boxes I went through were the boxes of newspapers. I certainly had underestimated the amount of newspapers I would be sorting through, but I loved the process. There were so many newspapers and even more newspaper clippings and I used two long tables to lay out and sort by publication and then by date. Finishing all of the newspaper boxes was so rewarding, but also a little sad, as I loved and would miss being able to stop every few papers to see an amazing headline from the early 1960s or 70s.

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I have since filed magazines, SVREP and SVRI newsletters, and many SVREP publications and reports. Everyday that I am at work, I am getting to touch and view pieces of important history. This job had made me more knowledgeable, more patient, and it has even helped me with the writing of my undergraduate thesis. The archivists that I work with are amazing and what is being done here in Special Collections is truly awesome. Both Leah and Jenn have put a lot of faith in me and have let me do a lot of this filing myself, but are also always there when I have a question or need support. It has been the perfect environment to learn and grow in. History majors may know the archives well, but I believe any student in any major could benefit from a trip to the reading room to check out some of the rare pieces of history that reside here at UTSA. I can’t wait for these boxes of SVREP files to be a part of the pieces you can check out.

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**This project is generously funded by the NHPRC**

Unique Transgender publications donated to UTSA Special Collections

March 20, 2017

Female Mimics, 1963

In February 2017, UTSA Special Collections received a treasure trove of unique items in a donation from the Digital Transgender Archive (DTA). “The purpose of the DTA is to increase the accessibility of transgender history by providing an online hub for digitized historical materials, born-digital materials, and information on archival holdings throughout the world.”[1] Because the DTA does not maintain physical materials on-site, after they digitize donations they find a suitable home among their contributing partners for the materials. In this instance, K.J. Rawson of the DTA contacted UTSA Special Collections as a possible repository for these items. Ten issues of Female Mimics magazine including the 1963 Premiere Issue are a jewel of the donation. The magazine was the first “glossy publication to focus on cross-dressers.”[2]  Issues now held in UTSA Special Collections date from   1963 through 1967.

Drag Magazine, 1973

Two issues of Drag magazine from 1973 offer a glimpse into transgender culture and concerns during the 1970s. Drag was published four times a year and was the “official voice of Queens Liberation Front, a homophile organization founded in 1969 and based in New York City.”[3]

The third serial in the donation is Lady Like which was published by Creative Design Services in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania. According to the editorial staff, “LadyLike is the first publication of its kind to be printed with a fresh approach. A balance of information and entertainment, more fact than fancy, in an open and airy format. LadyLike is a quarterly magazine dedicated to the principles of beauty, fashion and style, but not entirely restricted by them.”[4]

LadyLike, 1987

 

All three publications contain content that was revolutionary at the time each was published. Articles about sex reassignment surgery, hormone therapy, homosexuality, and often, explicit images filled the pages and in the case of LadyLike, the serial bore the words “Adults Only.”

Seven informational self-help books for cross dressers and those they love round out the donation.

These printed materials are of great value to scholars researching transvestism, the evolution of trans-identities, and gender fluidity. With LGBTQ+ materials as a collecting priority for UTSA Special Collections, the publications are a welcome addition as we strive to represent the diverse identities of marginalized populations.

The serials and books will be cataloged and made available for research in the very near future. An online guide for the materials will include links to digital versions that are part of the Digital Transgender Archive.

Female Mimics

Female Mimics 1

Female Mimics 4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Female mimics 2

Drag magazine

Drag magazine

LadyLike

Lady Like 3

Lady Like premiere issue 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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[1] Accessed on the Digital Transgender Archive [https://www.digitaltransgenderarchive.net/about/overview], March 17, 2017.

[2]Accessed on queerty.com [https://www.queerty.com/get-acquainted-female-mimics-premiere-drag-queen-glossy-magazine-1963-20170205], February 27, 2017.

[3] Drag: A Magazine About the Transvestite, edited by Lee G. Brewster (Queens Liberation Front: New York City, NY), 1973.

[4] LadyLike premier issue, (Creative Design Services: King of Prussia, PA), 1987.

 

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