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New Acquisitions for January 2015

February 12, 2015

Manuscript Collections

Elana Guajardo campaign flyer, MS 433

Elana Guajardo campaign flyer, 2010,  MS 433

New:

  • MS 433 Guajardo (Elena) papers, 1 linear foot (7 binders) of materials from Guajardo’s campaign for District 7 seat on San Antonio City Council
  • MS 434 Community Alliance for a United San Antonio (CAUSA) records, 1 linear foot of analog materials and 8GB of electronic records documenting the activities of CAUSA related to San Antonio’s non-discrimination ordinance
  • MS 435 Stonewall Democrats of San Antonio records, 1 linear foot (7 binders) of records including board meeting minutes, fundraising and event records
  • MS 427 Pfeiffer (Maria) photograph collection, .5 linear feet
  • MS 431 Hagemann (Leola Maurer) photograph collection, .25 linear feet
  • MS 432 Jones (Virginia Watson) photograph collection, .25 linear feet

Additions:

  • MS 64 Sinkin (William and Fay) Papers, 13 boxes

University Archives

Additions:

  • UA 05.02 UTSA. Library. Public Service Department, 1 VHS (.1 linear feet) Library reference video of microfilm use instruction, created circa 1987-1989 on VHS for the Library’s Public Services Department – view digitized video online
  • UA 07 UTSA. College of Business Records, 2 box (2 linear feet) records from the Office of International Business Programs

Rare Books: 14 Titles [January Title List]

Highlight:

Thomas School for Girls, San Antonio, THE LAKE BREEZE vol.4, no.4–May, 1906. A single issue of this “magazine” for this exclusive girls school in San Antonio. Measures approx. 6″ X 9.25″ with stiff, light brown paper wrappers, total of pages printed on faintly beige, glossy paper stock. About 2/3 of the booklet is devoted to school news, activities, athletics, classes, student poems, letters home, diplomas granted, etc. The last 1/3 is ads from local businesses and professional people. No photos–all text. The cover art is signed by the student artist, 14-year old Aline Badger, later Aline Badger Carter (1892-1972) who is also the author. [description provided by book dealer].

New finding aids online – Leo Brewer and Leo Garza

February 9, 2015

Two new finding aids are now available online – Leo Garza and Leo Brewer.

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leogarza_TNLeo Garza Political Cartoon collection

Garza was born Leonel Garza in McAllen, Texas but spent most of his early life in Laredo. He attended Laredo public schools and graduated in 1975 from Martin High School. After graduation he attended Laredo Jr College and worked at the Laredo Morning Times in the 1980s. In 1987 Garza moved from Laredo to San Antonio and was hired by the San Antonio Express News. Garza was a political cartoonist for the Express News from 1987 to 2007. His daily strip cartoons touched on a variety of national and local topics, from national and state elections, to San Antonio social and cultural events. Characters Nacho Gurache and his sidekick Fulano entertained readers with their comical misadventures and often frank commentary on San Antonio life. In 2007, Garza began painting and selling Western Art, including a series of murals for the Cibolo Creek Ranch in West Texas. He died May 17th, 2014 of kidney cancer.

The collection is comprised of original pen and ink and mixed media comic panels and strips, composed on matte paper (1987-1990, 1994-2000) and art board (1990-1994). Vertically and horizontally aligned strips are represented, and there are both continuity strips and “gag-a-day” strips in the collection.

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leobrewerLeo Brewer Papers

Leo Brewer was born in Kentucky on July 9, 1889 and graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1905 and Harvard Law School in 1914. After serving during World War I as an officer in the field artillery, Brewer moved to San Antonio and served for two years as assistant U.S. Attorney. In 1926 he joined the law faculty at the University of Texas and was on the editorial board of the Texas Law Review. In 1956, Brewer returned to San Antonio, joining the faculty at St. Mary’s School of Law. He served on several boards in San Antonio, including president of the San Antonio School Board and the board of trustees of the San Antonio Public Library. At the time of his death, Brewer was a trustee of St. Mary’s Law School. Leo Brewer died on November 3, 1965.

The bulk of the collection consists of the diaries and correspondence of Leo Brewer. Also included are Army orders, Army medals, and a photograph.

 

San Antonio Lesbian Gay Assembly Records 1990-1998: a glimpse into LGBTQ community dynamics now available digitally

February 2, 2015

UTSA Libraries Special Collections has defined LGBTQ materials as one of its top collecting priorities. In efforts to make  records of this historically underrepresented community more accessible, Special Collections staff have worked diligently to identify collection materials for digitization that would be of particular interest to scholars, researchers, and community members. The San Antonio Lesbian and Gay Assembly (SALGA) Records, 1990-1998 represent one such collection. Collection items have been digitized and can now be accessed online.

SALGA conference program, 1992

SALGA conference program logo, 1992

In 1992, SALGA was organized to bring together lesbian and gay organizations, businesses, and individuals to network for mutual support, share and disperse information, educate and serve the community as a whole and to promote the social welfare of, eliminate discrimination and prejudice against and defend the human and civil rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender people. Dulce Benavides and Brad Veloz were co-chairs and leaders of SALGA throughout the organization’s life. In addition to sponsoring the Gay/Lesbian Conference from 1992-1994, SALGA was the sponsor of the San Antonio Annual Lesbian/Gay Pride Picnic from 1990 until 1997.

In 1997, divisions within the LGBTQ community surfaced as two separate factions squared off over the who should control San Antonio’s annual Pride festivities. Some within the community accused SALGA of mishandling of funds raised at previous years’ Pride celebrations. The divisiveness and accusations culminated with the creation of a second Pride Picnic organized by the Unity Foundation on the same weekend as the picnic sponsored by SALGA. The statement at the bottom of the UNITY Foundation Pride Picnic flier, “All proceeds from the 1997 Pride Picnic will be publicly disclosed and accounted,” was a direct jab at SALGA’s handling of picnic proceeds from years past and fanned the flames of contention between the two agencies.

Unity Foundation Pride Picnic flier, 1997

UNITY Foundation Pride Picnic flier, 1997

SALGA Pride Picnic flier, 1997

SALGA Pride Picnic flier, 1997

SALGA chose not to attack UNITY directly in picnic fliers, but did claim their Pride celebration as “San Antonio’s #1 Gay/Lesbian Tradition.” No mention was made of where funds raised would go nor that an accounting and disclosure would be made after the event was over. However, in the wake of the dueling Pride Picnics, SALGA co-chairs Dulce Benavides and Brad Veloz released a statement summarizing their view of events leading up to the schism. Correspondence in the later part of 1997 reveals that wounds opened during the split only intensified as the year marched on.

In 1998, SALGA dissolved; the eight year life of the organization, once so vital to San Antonio’s LGBTQ community came to an end. The San Antonio Lesbian Gay Assembly records provide an interesting glimpse into efforts to galvanize the city’s queer community and conversely, events that worked to tear the community apart. The collection offers scholars and others the opportunity to investigate community dynamics as LGBTQ individuals and organizations worked to define their place within the evolving milieu of San Antonio’s queer culture.

 

 

Microform rewind

January 27, 2015
Screen shot of a Library reference video, created circa 1987-1989 on VHS for the Library's Public Services Department. Digitized and uploaded by UTSA Libraries Special Collections as part of UA 05.02.

Screen shot of a Library reference video, created circa 1987-1989 on VHS for the Library’s Public Services Department. Digitized and uploaded by UTSA Libraries Special Collections as part of UA 05.02.

Special Collections staff have been contributing to the Libraries’ instructional outreach by introducing students to basic archival research for years now. Our efforts include things like creating research guides, reference assistance (virtual and in-person), and taking part in library instruction. During an instruction section last week, I realized that many students in the room were unfamiliar with microform, a method of preserving and duplicating textual documents and printed material. Evidently microform (aka microfilm, if its on a film reel) has lost popularity among scholarly researchers as digitization has become the most popular method of copying materials and making them accessible.

Microform has an interesting history (which you can peruse in this Wikipedia article) and is still widely used as a method of accessing research materials. Those of us familiar with the process of using microfilm likely remember the clicking, whirring, fast-spinning screens, and the abundance of knobs and switches associated with research (for a flashback, check out this video produced by the Library’s Public Services Department in the late 80s). While online research and digitized, fully text-searchable content is the new norm, it is important to remember that not all archival materials have been digitized (or ever will be digitized!). Some content may not yet be digitized, but could be available in microform, making this an excellent option for research.

UTSA Libraries maintains many microform collections, which are open and accessible at the John Peace Library and the Downtown Campus. Special Collections also maintains microfilm collections, including newspaper runs relevant to San Antonio’s history (available for viewing at our HemisFair Park/ITC reading room) and archival microfiche copies of older UTSA theses & dissertations.

San Antonio Collectors and Their Collections

January 19, 2015

By the 1920s collecting as a hobby was becoming commonplace in San Antonio.  It was no longer just a pursuit for the wealthy, but for anyone with the time to acquire objects and a place to store them.  Local newspapers discovered this activity as a good subject for an occasional brief feature, usually accompanied by a photograph.  Some of the collectors were prominent citizens who acquired museum-quality objects with the intention of someday sharing them with the public.  But most were ordinary people who gathered inexpensive items purely for their own satisfaction.

These are some of those photographs, dating from the 1920s to the 1960s, that were taken by the San Antonio Light newspaper photographers.   All are included in our San Antonio Light Photograph Collection (MS 359).

 

Gillie Turk with her collection of thermometer keys from each of the 46 cities in 38 states that she has visited, October 1939  (MS 359:  L-2258-D)

Gillie Turk with her collection of thermometer keys, keepsakes from each of the 46 cities in 38 states that she has visited, October 1939 (MS 359: L-2258-D)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles O. Neumann, photographer and avocational entomologist, stands with cases of insects that he began collecting at age ten, December 1936.  (MS 359:  L-1521-B)

Charles O. Neumann, photographer and avocational entomologist, stands with cases of insects that he began collecting at age ten, December 1936. (MS 359: L-1521-B)

 

Mrs. Albert Friedrich rings two bells from her collection composed of over a 100 examples from all over the world, many purchased during her travels, April 1940.  (MS 359:  L-2435-C)

Mrs. Albert Friedrich holds two bells from her collection of over a 100 from all over the world, many purchased during her travels, April 1940. (MS 359: L-2435-C)

 

Mrs. Ernst Schuchard examines a ceramic duck figurine from the collection in her home on King William Street, February 1942.  (MS 359:  L-2907-G)

Mrs. Ernst Schuchard examines a ceramic duck figurine from the collection in her home on King William Street, February 1942. (MS 359: L-2907-G)

 

Bob Grimsinger in his “home arsenal” with guns he began collecting after inheriting an antique one, July 1941.

Bob Grimsinger in his “home arsenal” with guns he began collecting after inheriting an antique one, July 1941.

 

Mildred Fields with examples of the many bottles she has collected since she began the hobby at age ten, November 1937.  (MS 359:  L-1696-F)

Mildred Fields with examples of the many bottles she has collected since she began the hobby at age ten, November 1937. (MS 359: L-1696-F)

 

Thomas J. Mullihan plays a Stradivarius from his collection of 125 violins, most located by listening for violin music as he traveled along local streets, September 1925.  (MS 359:  L-0394-N)

Thomas J. Mullihan plays a Stradivarius from his collection of 125 violins, mostly located by listening for violin music as he traveled along local streets, September 1925. (MS 359: L-0394-N)

 

Vennette Hamel, manager of Schaper’s Food Market, dusts collection of souvenir plates in her home on East Schley Street, January 1954.  (MS 359:  L-4639-C)

Venettie Hamel, manager of Schaper’s Food Market, dusts a collection of souvenir plates that has overtaken a room in her home on East Schley Street, January 1954. (MS 359: L-4639-C)

 

Mary Templeton stands in a specially-built room to house her collection of over 1500 pitchers, primarily gifts from friends or tradesmen, August 1941.  (MS 359: L-2807-B)

Mary Templeton stands in a specially-built room to house her collection of over 1500 pitchers, primarily gifts from friends or tradesmen, August 1941. (MS 359: L-2807-B)

 

Henry Willis displays some of the Coca-Cola bottles from his large collection, each embossed with the name of a different city where the drink was bottled, August 1939.  (MS 359:  L-2224-G)

Henry Willis displays some of the Coca-Cola bottles from his large collection, each embossed with the name of a different city where the drink was bottled, August 1939. (MS 359: L-2224-G)

 

Mrs. A. L. Ernst sits next to her display of 155 pairs of salt and pepper shakers, most given to her by friends, December 1940.  (MS 359:  L-2626-C)

Mrs. A. L. Ernst sits next to her display of 155 pairs of salt and pepper shakers, most of them  gifts from friends, December 1940. (MS 359: L-2626-C)

 

L. Harold Shugart, shipping clerk at the Texas Company, with his collection of mechanical advertising pencils, some with a sample of the company product mounted in the top, January 1941.  (MS 359:  L-2645-G)

L. Harold Shugart, shipping clerk at the Texas Company, with his collection of mechanical advertising pencils, some with a sample of the company product mounted in the top, January 1941. (MS 359: L-2645-G)

 

Mrs. Sam Fields with baskets made of various materials and from countries around the world, February 1941.  (MS 359:  L-2672-J)

Mrs. Sam Fields with baskets made of various materials and from countries around the world, February 1941. (MS 359: L-2672-J)

 

Monroe Nowotny, taxidermist, holds a rock in the shape of a dog and another in the shape of a rose from his collection, weighing 40 tons, that he intends to install in his own museum, March 1948.  (MS 359:  L-3532-C)

Monroe Nowotny, taxidermist, holds a rock in the shape of a dog and another in the shape of a rose from his collection, weighing 40 tons, that he intends to install in his own museum, March 1948. (MS 359: L-3532-C)

 

Fire Chief J. G. Sarran poses with his antique weapons, hunting trophies, and an assortment of odd curios that are displayed in his special room that is reminiscent of the European Wunderkammer (“wonder-room”), November 1932.  (MS 359: L-0332-F)

Fire Chief J. G. Sarran poses with his antique weapons, hunting trophies, and an assortment of odd curios that are displayed in a special room that is reminiscent of the European Wunderkammer (“wonder-room”), November 1932. (MS 359: L-0332-F)

 

Marion Koogler McNay stands next to a self-portrait of Paul Gaugin, one of the many significant works of art in her home that later became the McNay Art Museum, May 1942.  (MS 359:  L-2953-C)

Marion Koogler McNay stands next to a self-portrait of Paul Gaugin, one of the many significant works of art in her home that later became the McNay Art Museum, May 1942. (MS 359: L-2953-C)

 

Robert L. B. Tobin, a major collector of theater arts, shows some of his rare volumes, etchings, and engravings, later housed in the Tobin Wing of the McNay Art Musuem, April 1963.  [MS 359:  L-6076-D]

Robert L. B. Tobin, a major collector of theater arts, shows some of his rare volumes, etchings, and engravings, later housed in the Tobin Wing of the McNay Art Musuem, April 1963. [MS 359: L-6076-D]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Acquisitions for December 2014

January 15, 2015

Manuscript Collections

New:

  • MS 430.  Beinecke (Bridgette) papers, 5 feet (6 boxes) of historic preservation research files compiled by architect Bridgette Beinecke

Additions:

  • MS 428. Gene Elder papers, 1.5 linear feet of photographs, correspondence, exhibit documents, artwork, and AV materials.
  • MS 421.  Brown and Lane Family papers, 1 linear foot of Lane famil
    y correspondence.
  • MS 67. Hattie Elam Briscoe papers, 1 framed photograph and program (.5 linear feet).

Rare Books: 32 Titles [December Title List]

Press and the People on the Importance of a Southern Line of Railway to the Pacific and In Favor of Government Aid to the Texas and Pacific RailwayHighlight:

THE PRESS AND THE PEOPLE ON THE IMPORTANCE OF A SOUTHERN LINE OF RAILWAY TO THE PACIFIC AND IN FAVOR OF GOVERNMENT AID TO THE TEXAS AND PACIFIC RAILWAY. Philadelphia: McLaughlin Brothers’ Book and Job Printing Establishment, 1875. 9 1/4″ x 5 7/8″ in printed wrappers. 72 pp., index. Colonel Benton’s speech in favor of a Southern Pacific Railroad; Message of Governor Porter of Tennessee, on the Texas and Pacific Railway; Resolutions of the National and State Granges; list of the various commercial bodies which have appealed to Congress to help the Texas and Pacific Railway; views expressed by Calhoun, Clay, Douglass, Polk and Sumner; statement showing the amount expended by the government for public works and railroads in each state and territory of the Union; subsidies to Pacific Railroads; the snow blockade on the Central Pacific; various newspaper extracts from various states showing support for government aid to the Texas and Pacific Railway; etc. The Texas Grange supported state aid to economic development as indicated in a quote by W.W. Lang, master of the Texas State Grange, in which he endorsed state aid to the Texas and Pacific Railroad. He felt that the railroad would provide protection against the Indians and help meet the needs for commercial facilities and avenues of trade in the “poverty-stricken South.” [description provided by bookseller]

The Digital Future: A look back from our Fall 2014 intern

December 29, 2014

During the Fall 2014 semester UTSA Libraries Special Collections was delighted to host Angelique Kelley as an intern working with our removable media and born-digital materials.  She has contributed the following post about her experience working with us:

As part of a Certificate in Digital Curation program offered at the Johns Hopkins University, I was required to complete a 13-week internship during the Fall 2104 semester. The goal of this internship was to gain valuable first-hand experience in digitally preserving collections within cultural institutions. I was fortunate enough to be able to complete my internship with the UTSA Special Collections department, during a time when the UTSA Libraries were exploring various options for the long-term preservation of their Manuscripts collections. The digital preservation process is still ongoing, but the support I was able to offer during my internship should help provide the foundation from which the department can build upon and move forward.

Chart of all media types found in Manuscript Collections during Fall 2014 inventory.

Chart of all media types (A/V and computer) found in Manuscript Collections during the Fall 2014 inventory.

The project I worked on consisted of several stages. During the first stage I performed a physical inventory of the removable media objects within the Manuscripts collections. This task consisted of searching the libraries’ online repository using finding aids to locate possible media and then using the department’s Access database to locate the physical location of each collection in the stacks. From there I updated a spreadsheet that had been previously created during a prior attempt to inventory removable media, annotating the number and types of removable media discovered. In the end, over 1,600 removable media objects were identified within the collections, consisting of twenty different media types. The information gathered during the inventory process was later used to write a report for the second stage of my project.

In early 2014, Special Collections participated in the Society of American Archivists’ Jump In Too/Two initiative, a project designed to encourage archives to take the first steps in digitally preserving their collections. During UTSA’s participation in this project they examined the University Archives collections, and upon completion of the project they were required to submit a report outlining the processes used, the equipment utilized, and their results. This report served as the basis for my own report which discussed the findings from the inventory I performed within the Manuscripts collections.

The final stage of my project involved the creation of workflow proposals for digitally preserving the inventoried removable media. Prior to my internship, UTSA had acquired access to BitCurator, an open-source digital forensics software program, as well as authorization to participate in the Archivematica + DuraCloud beta testing, a hosted system designed to aid in the ingest and long-term digital preservation of archival and museum collections. With these two programs as the focus, I created three possible workflows that examined how the various tools within these software packages might be utilized to effectively ingest, process, and store digital assets from within the libraries’ collections. These workflows will later be tested using a representative sampling from the collections with the goal of determining the overall practicality of the proposed workflows.

I went into this internship not quite knowing what to expect, as my primary focus has always been on museums, not archives, but I found my time with Special Collections to be invaluable. The first-hand knowledge I gained working with the various software packages, in addition to the inventory process, offered valuable insight into typical archival practices. Furthermore, this internship allowed me to explore the difficulties all cultural institutions face in trying to move forward with digital preservation. I have taken away so much from my time with Special Collections and I look forward to using my new found knowledge as I move forward with my personal career goals.

Angelique Kelley

Angelique Kelley, Fall 2014 intern at UTSA Libraries Special Collections

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