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Introducing Carlos Cortéz

March 2, 2015
selfie

A selfie at the reading room.

Carlos Cortéz has been working at Special Collections for eight months. Before working at UTSA Libraries Special Collections, he began his academic career at Palo Alto College and then transferred to UTSA where he double majored in History and Physics. Carlos decided to work on his History degree first and received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from UTSA where he concentrated on European history, particularly the history of Spain. As an undergraduate his research seminar paper was on Late Roman/Medieval Spain and as graduate student focused on the Spanish Civil War. He did support work in Anthropology with an emphasis on Mayan archaeology. Carlos’ studies in Spanish history lead him to study the history of the Spanish language and the history of colonial Texas and San Antonio. Fascination with Spanish history and culture motivated Carlos to travel to Spain where he visited Madrid and Toledo.

Carlos’ experience at Special Collections began as a graduate student. As a work-study, he had the opportunity to learn from the rare books librarian, university archivist, and photo curator, Tom Shelton. It was during this time  he learned how archives worked. Carlos was involved on various projects, such as digitization, basic preservation, translation, and organizing the Zintgraff and The Texas Folk Life Festival collections.

As a Library Assistant II, Carlos works mostly with the massive photograph collection processing photo orders for customers and helping patrons with their research in the Special Collections reading room located at the Institute of Texan Cultures. When not at Special Collections, Carlos can be found working out at the gym. He enjoys watching movies, painting, reading, traveling, sports and taking selfies. He writes short stories and is currently working on a novel and hopes to become a published author.

Will Kell, the newest member of Special Collections

February 23, 2015

Will Kell is the new Library Assistant II in Special Collections at the John Peace Library. He is a graduate student in the history program at UTSA and his area of interest is in Latin American history, primarily Guatemala during the Ríos Montt administration. Will is working on a master’s thesis entitled “Heavenly Discourse: FUNDAPI and Guatemala’s Attempt to Change Public Perception.” His thesis examines the relationship between the non-governmental organization Fundación de Ayuda al Pueblo Indígena (FUNDAPI) and Ríos Montt. Will has conducted research at the Tulane University Roger Thayer Stone Center for Latin American Studies, the University of Texas at Austin Benson Latin America Collection, the Archivo General de Centro América, and the Biblioteca Nacional de Guatemala. Additionally, Will conducted several interviews throughout Guatemala. Aside from school and his research, he enjoys reading, writing, running, and traveling. He looks forward to working in Special Collections and assisting the scholarly community.

Will is located in the center with the Maui sweatshirt. He is pictured with his students from the Escuela Oficial Rural Mixta in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala. He volunteered at the school to teach the basics of the English language.

Will is located in the center with the Maui sweatshirt. He is pictured with his students from the Escuela Oficial Rural Mixta in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala. He volunteered at the school to teach the basics of the English language.

Celebrities Visit the San Antonio Stock Show and Rodeo

February 16, 2015

Celebrities have entertained audiences since the early days of the annual livestock show and rodeo.  In recent times, about 20 different entertainers come for one or two shows.  During the first few years, only a couple of well-known performers were featured.  These hardy individuals would usually stay throughout the event, participating in a variety of ancillary activities:  a public welcoming ceremony at the airport, the western parade, presentation of the livestock winners, receptions– and visits to schools and hospitals between formal events.

These are photographs from the Zintgraff Studio Collection (MS 355) that provide glimpses of those celebrity visits from the 1950s through the 1970s.

 

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans arrive in San Antonio on a Trans-Texas airliner, February 14, 1961 (MS 355:  Z-2492-A-22738)

Roy Rogers and Dale Evans arrive in San Antonio, February 14, 1961 (MS 355: Z-2492-A-22738)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Students, civic dignitaries, and business leaders are among the crowd welcoming the “King and Queen of the Cowboys.”  (MS 355:  Z-2492-A-22726)

Students, civic dignitaries, and business leaders are among the crowd welcoming the “King and Queen of the Cowboys.”  (MS 355: Z-2492-A-22726)

 

Rex Allen pauses to greet a fan as he circles the arena on KoKo,” the miracle horse of the movies,” during the rodeo entertainment program, 1953.  (MS 355:  Z-2469-B-22738)

Rex Allen pauses to greet a fan as he circles the arena on KoKo, ” the miracle horse of the movies,” during the rodeo entertainment program, 1953.  (MS 355: Z-2469-B-22738)

 

Gene Autry and Gail Davis “Annie Oakley” lead the western parade that officially opens the Stock Show and Rodeo, February 7, 1958.  (MS 355:  Z-2484-A-03)

Gene Autry and Gail Davis “Annie Oakley” lead the western parade that officially opens the Stock Show and Rodeo, February 7, 1958.   (MS 355: Z-2484-A-03)

 

Gail Davis and Gene Autry pose with admirers in front of a clothes rack at the coliseum, where they performed, February 1958.  (MS 355:  Z-2484-B-01)

Gail Davis and Gene Autry pose with admirers in front of a clothing rack at the coliseum, February 1958.    (MS 355: Z-2484-B-01)

 

Jimmy Dean “Mr. Country Music” prepares to ride into the rodeo area, where he will dismount and sing to the crowd, 1960.  (MS 355:  Z-2490-C-01)

Jimmy Dean “Mr. Country Music” prepares to ride into the rodeo area, where he will dismount and sing to the crowd, 1960.  (MS 355: Z-2490-C-01)

 

Cliff Robertson (second from left), star of the popular television program “Tales of Wells Fargo,” poses with G.D. Johnson, Jr.(left) and his Reserve Grand Champion Steer, February 13, 1961.  (MS 355:  Z-2492-A-22827)

Cliff Robertson (second from left), star of the popular television program “Tales of Wells Fargo,” poses with G.D. Johnson, Jr.(left) and his Reserve Grand Champion Steer, February 13, 1961. (MS 355: Z-2492-A-22827)

 

Anita Bryant, America’s top female vocalist at the time, performs during her first rodeo entertainment performance, February 1962.  (MS 355:  Z-2495-B-28510)

Anita Bryant, America’s top female vocalist at the time, sings during her first rodeo entertainment performance, February 1962.  (MS 355: Z-2495-B-28510)

 

Rodeo song-and-dance team performers Kirby Grant, television’s flying cowboy “Sky King,” and Gloria Winters “Penny King,” ride in the western parade, February 8, 1963.  (MS 355:  Z-2499-A-R66)

Song-and-dance team Kirby Grant, television’s flying cowboy “Sky King,” and Gloria Winters “Penny King,” ride in the western parade, February 8, 1963. (MS 355: Z-2499-A-R66)

 

Lassie, star of the “Lassie” CBS television series, rides past crowd outside the Majestic Theater, February 8, 1963.  (MS 355:  Z-2499-A-R71)

Lassie, star of the “Lassie” CBS television series, rides past crowd outside the Majestic Theater, February 8, 1963. (MS 355: Z-2499-A-R71)

 

Lassie, star of the “Lassie” CBS television series, rides past crowd outside the Majestic Theater, February 8, 1963.  (MS 355:  Z-2499-A-R71)

Lassie shakes hands with fans between appearances in the rodeo entertainment programs at Freeman Coliseum, February 1963.  (MS 355: Z-2495-B-28510)

 

Country music singer Judy Lynn, in one of her elaborate costumes by Nudie of Hollywood, poses with Joe (left) and Harry Freeman, February 1965.  (MS 355:  Z-2508-C-251)

Country music singer Judy Lynn, wearing one of her elaborate costumes by Nudie of Hollywood, poses with Joe (left) and Harry Freeman, February 1965. (MS 355: Z-2508-C-251)

 

Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner arrive at a welcoming reception, February 1970.  (MS 355:  Z-2521-C-592)

Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner arrive at a welcoming reception, February 1970. (MS 355: Z-2521-C-592)

 

Johnny Rodriguez, age 21, sings beside a special guest in the coliseum arena, February 1974.   (MS 355:  Z-2543-C-101750)

Johnny Rodriguez, age 21, sings beside a special guest in the Freeman Coliseum arena, February 1974. (MS 355: Z-2543-C-101750)

 

Singer and actor John Davidson poses with fans, February 1974.  (MS 355:  Z-2545-C-01)

Singer and actor John Davidson poses with fans, February 1974. (MS 355: Z-2545-C-01)

 

Freddy Fender poses with fans, February 1979.  (MS 355:  Z-2561-C-02-8)

Freddy Fender and fans, February 1979. (MS 355: Z-2561-C-02-8)

 

Freddy Fender on stage during the rodeo entertainment program, February 1979,  (MS 355:  Z-2561-C-01-4)

Freddy Fender on stage during the rodeo entertainment program, February 1979, (MS 355: Z-2561-C-01-4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Acquisitions for January 2015

February 12, 2015

Manuscript Collections

Elana Guajardo campaign flyer, MS 433

Elana Guajardo campaign flyer, 2010,  MS 433

New:

  • MS 433 Guajardo (Elena) papers, 1 linear foot (7 binders) of materials from Guajardo’s campaign for District 7 seat on San Antonio City Council
  • MS 434 Community Alliance for a United San Antonio (CAUSA) records, 1 linear foot of analog materials and 8GB of electronic records documenting the activities of CAUSA related to San Antonio’s non-discrimination ordinance
  • MS 435 Stonewall Democrats of San Antonio records, 1 linear foot (7 binders) of records including board meeting minutes, fundraising and event records
  • MS 427 Pfeiffer (Maria) photograph collection, .5 linear feet
  • MS 431 Hagemann (Leola Maurer) photograph collection, .25 linear feet
  • MS 432 Jones (Virginia Watson) photograph collection, .25 linear feet

Additions:

  • MS 64 Sinkin (William and Fay) Papers, 13 boxes

University Archives

Additions:

  • UA 05.02 UTSA. Library. Public Service Department, 1 VHS (.1 linear feet) Library reference video of microfilm use instruction, created circa 1987-1989 on VHS for the Library’s Public Services Department – view digitized video online
  • UA 07 UTSA. College of Business Records, 2 box (2 linear feet) records from the Office of International Business Programs

Rare Books: 14 Titles [January Title List]

Highlight:

Thomas School for Girls, San Antonio, THE LAKE BREEZE vol.4, no.4–May, 1906. A single issue of this “magazine” for this exclusive girls school in San Antonio. Measures approx. 6″ X 9.25″ with stiff, light brown paper wrappers, total of pages printed on faintly beige, glossy paper stock. About 2/3 of the booklet is devoted to school news, activities, athletics, classes, student poems, letters home, diplomas granted, etc. The last 1/3 is ads from local businesses and professional people. No photos–all text. The cover art is signed by the student artist, 14-year old Aline Badger, later Aline Badger Carter (1892-1972) who is also the author. [description provided by book dealer].

New finding aids online – Leo Brewer and Leo Garza

February 9, 2015

Two new finding aids are now available online – Leo Garza and Leo Brewer.

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leogarza_TNLeo Garza Political Cartoon collection

Garza was born Leonel Garza in McAllen, Texas but spent most of his early life in Laredo. He attended Laredo public schools and graduated in 1975 from Martin High School. After graduation he attended Laredo Jr College and worked at the Laredo Morning Times in the 1980s. In 1987 Garza moved from Laredo to San Antonio and was hired by the San Antonio Express News. Garza was a political cartoonist for the Express News from 1987 to 2007. His daily strip cartoons touched on a variety of national and local topics, from national and state elections, to San Antonio social and cultural events. Characters Nacho Gurache and his sidekick Fulano entertained readers with their comical misadventures and often frank commentary on San Antonio life. In 2007, Garza began painting and selling Western Art, including a series of murals for the Cibolo Creek Ranch in West Texas. He died May 17th, 2014 of kidney cancer.

The collection is comprised of original pen and ink and mixed media comic panels and strips, composed on matte paper (1987-1990, 1994-2000) and art board (1990-1994). Vertically and horizontally aligned strips are represented, and there are both continuity strips and “gag-a-day” strips in the collection.

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leobrewerLeo Brewer Papers

Leo Brewer was born in Kentucky on July 9, 1889 and graduated from the University of Kentucky in 1905 and Harvard Law School in 1914. After serving during World War I as an officer in the field artillery, Brewer moved to San Antonio and served for two years as assistant U.S. Attorney. In 1926 he joined the law faculty at the University of Texas and was on the editorial board of the Texas Law Review. In 1956, Brewer returned to San Antonio, joining the faculty at St. Mary’s School of Law. He served on several boards in San Antonio, including president of the San Antonio School Board and the board of trustees of the San Antonio Public Library. At the time of his death, Brewer was a trustee of St. Mary’s Law School. Leo Brewer died on November 3, 1965.

The bulk of the collection consists of the diaries and correspondence of Leo Brewer. Also included are Army orders, Army medals, and a photograph.

 

San Antonio Lesbian Gay Assembly Records 1990-1998: a glimpse into LGBTQ community dynamics now available digitally

February 2, 2015

UTSA Libraries Special Collections has defined LGBTQ materials as one of its top collecting priorities. In efforts to make  records of this historically underrepresented community more accessible, Special Collections staff have worked diligently to identify collection materials for digitization that would be of particular interest to scholars, researchers, and community members. The San Antonio Lesbian and Gay Assembly (SALGA) Records, 1990-1998 represent one such collection. Collection items have been digitized and can now be accessed online.

SALGA conference program, 1992

SALGA conference program logo, 1992

In 1992, SALGA was organized to bring together lesbian and gay organizations, businesses, and individuals to network for mutual support, share and disperse information, educate and serve the community as a whole and to promote the social welfare of, eliminate discrimination and prejudice against and defend the human and civil rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender people. Dulce Benavides and Brad Veloz were co-chairs and leaders of SALGA throughout the organization’s life. In addition to sponsoring the Gay/Lesbian Conference from 1992-1994, SALGA was the sponsor of the San Antonio Annual Lesbian/Gay Pride Picnic from 1990 until 1997.

In 1997, divisions within the LGBTQ community surfaced as two separate factions squared off over the who should control San Antonio’s annual Pride festivities. Some within the community accused SALGA of mishandling of funds raised at previous years’ Pride celebrations. The divisiveness and accusations culminated with the creation of a second Pride Picnic organized by the Unity Foundation on the same weekend as the picnic sponsored by SALGA. The statement at the bottom of the UNITY Foundation Pride Picnic flier, “All proceeds from the 1997 Pride Picnic will be publicly disclosed and accounted,” was a direct jab at SALGA’s handling of picnic proceeds from years past and fanned the flames of contention between the two agencies.

Unity Foundation Pride Picnic flier, 1997

UNITY Foundation Pride Picnic flier, 1997

SALGA Pride Picnic flier, 1997

SALGA Pride Picnic flier, 1997

SALGA chose not to attack UNITY directly in picnic fliers, but did claim their Pride celebration as “San Antonio’s #1 Gay/Lesbian Tradition.” No mention was made of where funds raised would go nor that an accounting and disclosure would be made after the event was over. However, in the wake of the dueling Pride Picnics, SALGA co-chairs Dulce Benavides and Brad Veloz released a statement summarizing their view of events leading up to the schism. Correspondence in the later part of 1997 reveals that wounds opened during the split only intensified as the year marched on.

In 1998, SALGA dissolved; the eight year life of the organization, once so vital to San Antonio’s LGBTQ community came to an end. The San Antonio Lesbian Gay Assembly records provide an interesting glimpse into efforts to galvanize the city’s queer community and conversely, events that worked to tear the community apart. The collection offers scholars and others the opportunity to investigate community dynamics as LGBTQ individuals and organizations worked to define their place within the evolving milieu of San Antonio’s queer culture.

 

 

Microform rewind

January 27, 2015
Screen shot of a Library reference video, created circa 1987-1989 on VHS for the Library's Public Services Department. Digitized and uploaded by UTSA Libraries Special Collections as part of UA 05.02.

Screen shot of a Library reference video, created circa 1987-1989 on VHS for the Library’s Public Services Department. Digitized and uploaded by UTSA Libraries Special Collections as part of UA 05.02.

Special Collections staff have been contributing to the Libraries’ instructional outreach by introducing students to basic archival research for years now. Our efforts include things like creating research guides, reference assistance (virtual and in-person), and taking part in library instruction. During an instruction section last week, I realized that many students in the room were unfamiliar with microform, a method of preserving and duplicating textual documents and printed material. Evidently microform (aka microfilm, if its on a film reel) has lost popularity among scholarly researchers as digitization has become the most popular method of copying materials and making them accessible.

Microform has an interesting history (which you can peruse in this Wikipedia article) and is still widely used as a method of accessing research materials. Those of us familiar with the process of using microfilm likely remember the clicking, whirring, fast-spinning screens, and the abundance of knobs and switches associated with research (for a flashback, check out this video produced by the Library’s Public Services Department in the late 80s). While online research and digitized, fully text-searchable content is the new norm, it is important to remember that not all archival materials have been digitized (or ever will be digitized!). Some content may not yet be digitized, but could be available in microform, making this an excellent option for research.

UTSA Libraries maintains many microform collections, which are open and accessible at the John Peace Library and the Downtown Campus. Special Collections also maintains microfilm collections, including newspaper runs relevant to San Antonio’s history (available for viewing at our HemisFair Park/ITC reading room) and archival microfiche copies of older UTSA theses & dissertations.

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