Skip to content

Flora and Fauna

May 31, 2016
Mountain laurel in bloom, March 1992.

Mountain laurel in bloom, March 1992. Photo source: Office of University Communications Photographs, UA 16.01.01, UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Every May, as classes end and students graduate or head off on summer adventures, I’m shocked to realize how quiet the university becomes—especially after the persistently frenzied feeling that signals the end of the spring semester. The vibe on campus settles into its summer rhythm, allowing a greater opportunity to notice the beauty of the outdoor spaces we inhabit in our daily working lives.

Tomato plants in the garden of the Back 40 at the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures.

Tomato plants in the garden of the Back 40 at the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures. Photo source: Kristin Law.

Tall corn in the garden of the Back 40 at the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures.

Tall corn in the garden of the Back 40 at the UTSA Institute of Texan Cultures. Photo source: Kristin Law.

Spending time on UTSA’s campuses offers many chances to experience the flora and fauna of our region, whether that includes stopping to smell the plants in the pioneer garden at the ITC’s Back 40, hearing the blue jays at Bill Miller Plaza downtown, or pausing to watch the lizards speed through the grass by my favorite lunch spot.

One recent morning, I spotted a furry gray creature blending into the gray concrete of Ximenes garage. At first glance, I mistakenly thought it was one of the campus cats, but soon realized it was actually a possum. Over the past year, I’ve learned that if I stay especially late in the evening, I might get to see one of the rabbits that resides near my office.

A possum snuggled into the concrete of the Ximenes garage.

A possum snuggled into the concrete of the Ximenes garage. Photo source: Kristin Law.

Nestled at the foot of the Texas Hill Country in one direction, and easily accessible to the rest of the city in the other, UTSA’s main campus is situated in a unique spot. Because of our location, the variety of wildlife is particularly entertaining and captivating. I’m grateful for the landscaping that integrates native plants in the spaces between buildings and I believe that staff from previous decades shared my appreciation for campus wildlife. Numerous scenic views show up in the Office of University Communications Photographs collection, proving that campus is a lively and colorful place to be, even when class is not in session.

Redbud trees in the central courtyard, February 1992.

Redbud trees in the central courtyard, February 1992. Photo source: Office of University Communications Photographs, UA 16.01.01, UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

One Comment leave one →
  1. June 3, 2016 8:06 am

    Reblogged this on stillness of heart and commented:
    It is such a beautiful campus.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: