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Now Online: Publications of the Texas Biomedical Institute

March 25, 2013
Progress in Biomedical Research Vol. I,  No. 3 (May 1955). Biomedical Research Institute Publications Collection (MS 378). UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Progress in Biomedical Research Vol. I, No. 3 (May 1955). Biomedical Research Institute Publications Collection (MS 378). UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Special Collections is pleased to announce that more than 200 publications from the Texas Biomedical Research Institute are now available online in UTSA Libraries’ Digital Collections.

The Texas Biomedical Research Institute was founded by San Antonio businessman and philanthropist Tom Slick in 1941 as the Foundation of Applied Research (FAR). Originally, FAR was intended as a broad research center encompassing agriculture, natural sciences, and medicine. Early work was conducted in the areas of military inventions, cloud-seeding, and on-site construction.

In time, the Institute came to specialize in medical research, with a particular focus on infectious diseases, cancer research, heart disease, and neonatal diseases. In 1958, a baboon colony was established at the Institute for medical research. Today this has grown into the Southwest National Primate Research Center, which holds the largest captive baboon population in the world, as well as large numbers of chimpanzees and other primates. Key areas of primate research include infectious diseases, chronic diseases, development and aging, and genomics.

Progress in Biomedical Research (Fall 2003). Biomedical Research Institute Publications Collection (MS 378). UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Progress in Biomedical Research (Fall 2003). Biomedical Research Institute Publications Collection (MS 378). UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Over the course of the past six decades, the Texas Biomedical Research Institute has played an important role in many medical breakthroughs,  including the development of a Hepatitis B vaccine, a high frequency ventilator for premature babies, and genetic analysis software. A few areas of ongoing and future research include the genetic factors of depression, drug resistant malaria, and filovirus (e.g. Ebola, Marburg) vaccine development.

The Institute’s name has changed several times since its founding, from the Foundation of Applied Research to the Southwest Foundation for Research and Education in 1952, then to the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research in 1984, and and mostly recently to the Texas Biomedical Research Institute in 2011.

The Texas Biomedical Research Institute Publications Collection includes issues of three serial publications: Progress in Biomedical Research (1954- ), Annual Report (1953- ), and Scientific Report (2009- ). The collection includes two monograph titles:  The First Half Century and A Stereotaxic Atlas of the Brain of the Baboon (Papio). Special Collections also holds the papers of the Institute’s founder Tom Slick.


Sources:

Sean Heyliger, A Guide to the Texas Biomedical Research Institute Publications Collection, 1953-2011. Accessed March 12, 2013.

Stacy Maloney, “Southwest Foundation for BioMedical Research.” Handbook of Texas Online. Accessed March 12, 2013.

Texas Biomedical Research Institute, “Southwest National Primate Research Center.” Texas Biomedical Research Institute Web Site. Accessed March 12, 2013.

Kenneth P. Trevett, J.D., “Letter from the President,” Progress (Fall 2012). Accessed March 12, 2013.

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