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National Poetry Month: San Antonio

April 27, 2009

San Antonio is a city known for its rich history. For our last National Poetry Month installment, we are highlighting the city as the subject of poems.

It would be an understatement to say that Frank Jennings is interested in San Antonio history. He is the founder of San Antonio Founder’s Day and the author of numerous works on the history of the city, including The Story of an Enchanted City, which is a comprehensive overview of San Antonio and it’s cultural heritage. Jennings’ interest in San Antonio’s history extends to his involvment in the Texas State Historical Association, the San Antonio Historical Association, the San Antonio Genealogical and Historical Society, the San Antonio Conservation Society and other local organizations.


San Antonio poem, Frank Jennings Papers, MS 161, Box 2.

All discussions of San Antonio history will inevitably include a mention of the story of the Alamo and its role in the Texas Revolution.

Alamo poem (page 1), J.Y. Powell, February 26, 1906, Aline B. Carter Family Papers

Aline B. Carter is most widely known for her work as a poet, but she was also interested in music, art, philosophy and astronomy. Her aim in life was to work through the arts for world peace. Aline served as Poet Laureate of Texas from 1947-1949 and as vice-president of the Poetry Society of Texas. Aline published and illustrated her first book of poetry, Halo of Love, donating all proceeds to charity. In 1968 she published a second book, Doubt Not the Dream.
The Aline B. Carter Family Papers document the prominent poet and five generations of her family in the form of correspondence, notebooks, diaries, newsclippings, a few photographs and a historical fiction manuscript.

This two-page ode to the Alamo was written in February 1906 by J.Y. Powell, a surveyor and civil engineer from Chillicothe, Missouri and was found amongst the papers.

Alamo poem (page 2), J.Y. Powell, February 26, 1906, Aline B. Carter Family Papers

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