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New Acquisitions for September 2014

October 16, 2014

Manuscript Collections

Additions:

  • MS 22. Women’s Overseas Service League Records – 7 linear feet of records and artifacts from the Washington, DC unit

University Archives

Additions:

  • UA 15.01.15 UTSA. ITC. Research and Collections Department, .33 feet of items deposited by Sarah Gould, Lead Curatorial Researcher
  • UA 99.0020 UTSA. Papers of Faculty and Staff: Perry, George, 1 linear foot of correspondence
  • UA 14.01 UTSA. Center for Archaeological Research Publications Collection, 25 pdfs

Education and Religion in Seguin

October 6, 2014
"Seguin's Old Oak Trees" In An Authentic History of Guadalupe County (1951) by Willie Mae Weinert. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

“Seguin’s Old Oak Trees” In An Authentic History of Guadalupe County (1951) by Willie Mae Weinert. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Seguin is located east and slightly north of San Antonio in Guadalupe County. At the time of Martín de Alarcón’s explorations in 1718-19, the area was inhabited by migratory Lipan Apache and Tonkawa tribes. Subsequently, several Mexican and Anglo land titles were established in the region, including that of José Antonio Navarro’s ranch, just north of present-day Seguin. The town became the county seat of Guadalupe County when it was formed in 1846 and was incorporated in 1853.

In 1831 Umphries Branch, arguably the first Anglo settler in the area, received a league of land on the northeast bank of the Guadalupe. Initially called Walnut Springs when it was laid out in 1838 by thirty-three shareholders, the town was re-named in 1839 in honor of Juan N. Seguín, an important political and military figure in he Texas Revolution and its aftermath.

An Authentic History of Guadalupe County (1951) by Willie Mae Weinert may be somewhat lacking in narrative flow, but provides a wealth of details about dates, names, and legislation relating to Seguin’s 19th and early 20th century history. This book also includes several one-page illustrated features on unique aspects of Seguin’s history. One of these highlights the City’s care in preserving its many ancient live oak trees, including several on the Court House lawn. According to local lore, a generous hunter in the mid-19th century hung a slaughtered buffalo from one of the  live oaks in Central  Park, accompanied by a knife for passersby to cut off steaks, and a sign reading “Take what meat you  need, but woe to him who takes the knife.”

"Guadalupe College before and after the 1936 fire. (Leon Studio)" In Under the Live Oak Tree: A history of Seguin (1988) by E. John Gesick, Jr. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

“Guadalupe College before and after the 1936 fire. (Leon Studio)” In Under the Live Oak Tree: A history of Seguin (1988) by E. John Gesick, Jr. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

The residents of Seguin have a long-standing tradition of founding and supporting educational institutions. Seguin’s first schoolhouse was established around 1845 by Methodist Minister Reverend David Evans Thompson and his wfe Elizabeth Ann Thompson. By 1850, a high school had been established that offered a Male Acadmy and a Female Academy. Other religious denominations also pursued educational efforts, and in conjunction with the Second Baptist Church, the Freedman’s Bureau established a school for African Americans in 1871. Further details of Seguin’s educational history (as well as more general history and details of the community’s civil war involvement) may be found in Under the Live Oak Tree: A History of Seguin (1988) by E. John Gesick, Jr.

A recent memoir entitled Crossing Guadalupe Street: Growing Up Hispanic & Protestant (2001) by David Maldonado, Jr. looks at some more difficult aspects of Seguin’s history. While Maldonado recounts many happy memories of growing up in the security of his extended family and the Methodist Church that they attended, he also recalls the social, ethnic, and religious divisions that fragmented Seguin and many other small Texas towns in the pre-civil rights and pre-Vatican II era.

In addition to these volumes, other materials relating to Seguin in Special Collections include an Inventory of the County Archives of Texas. No. 94 Guadalupe County (1939), Slave Transactions of Guadalupe County  (2009), and MS 221, a general store ledger from Seguin, TX including transactions between 1867-1870. A number of photographs of the community are available in UTSA Libraries Digital Collections.


Additional Sources

John Gesick, “SEGUIN, TX,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hes03), accessed September 24, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

New Exhibits in Special Collections for Fall 2014

September 25, 2014

Starting this fall, UTSA Special Collections has installed new exhibits in the John Peace Library reading room. Each exhibit case represents a different unit within Special Collections:  Manuscripts, Photograph Collections, Rare Books and University Archives.

Manuscripts and Photograph Collections

072-0705

Persyn Family pose beside vegetable cart on farm near San Antonio, Texas, MS 362

Soon after World War I, a colony of Belgian immigrants established truck farms on the southwestern outskirts of San Antonio with the first farm being established along the San Antonio River not far from the Spanish mission, Concepcion. Derived from the French word “troquer” meaning to trade or barter, truck farms grew and sold an extensive variety of fresh vegetables, fruits, flowers and pecans in the markets of central San Antonio, particularly Military and Haymarket Plazas.

This most recent exhibit showcases materials from the Bexar County Truck Farmer’s Association, founded in 1939 as a co-operative, was organized to engage in activities in connection with the marketing or selling of the agricultural products of its members. As a complement to the manuscript material, photographs from the Belgian farmers that made up association are also on display.  Images include materials from the Aelvoet, Bauwens, Persyn,  and Verstuyft family farms. Additional images from Belgian Texans can be found in our digital collections.

Rare Books

Libreta de Cocina: Manuscript, Junio 17 de 1921-1951. María de los Angeles Dávalos. UTSA Libraries Special Collections

Libreta de Cocina: Manuscript, Junio 17 de 1921-1951. María de los Angeles Dávalos

The Mexican Cookbook Collection contains more than forty manuscript cookbooks. These handwritten recipes provide an intimate view of household cuisine over the course of more than two hundred years. They also show traces of other dimensions of family life. Most are recorded in small, lined notebooks, sometimes annotated with doodles, or written between (or over) school exercises. Six manuscript cookbooks will be on display during Fall 2014. Additional volumes are available in our digital collections.

University Archives

txsau_1.02_00017

The Discourse, Vol 1, No 5, June 1973, UA 1.02.01

The University Archives exhibit case contains highlights of the University of Texas at San Antonio Serials and Journals Collection, 1973-2009. The University Serials and Journals Collection (UA 1.02.01) includes newsletters and magazines produced by the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) News and Information Office, which later became the Office of Communications.  The publications were produced to distribute information among faculty and staff and share information about UTSA’s growth and activities with alumni, the community, and the larger public.  Researchers can use these collections to search for news announcements and calendar postings, to find information about faculty and staff, and to review broader articles about UTSA that were produced by staff writers.  Special Collections staff have digitized hundreds of issues, which are available and full-text searchable as part of the UTSA Publications collection.

Special Collections’ University Archives Contributes to “UTSA Traditions” Exhibit

September 22, 2014

On August 26, amidst fanfare and appearances of the Spirit of San Antonio Marching Band, the UTSA Cheerleaders, Mr. & Ms. UTSA, and President Romo, the official opening of the “UTSA Traditions” exhibit was launched at the University Center’s Gallery 23 exhibit space. The exhibit, which hosts many photographs and printed materials from Special Collections, was brought together as a “community effort” led by Jana Schwartz, Associate Director for University Center Communications & Programs. This summer, Schwartz and a team of student assistants spent hours looking through photographs and digital collections from our University Archives unit, which holds records documenting the history and culture of UTSA.

Jana Schwartz’ description of the exhibit:

The exhibit includes photographs, images, and artifacts provided from the UTSA community. As you explore the exhibit you will hear UTSA students talk about their favorite traditions and why they are important to our campus culture. This showcase of UTSA spirit and pride is an effort to bring together the entire UTSA community including students, faculty, staff, and alumni. This entire community has contributed to the various traditions that have added to our vibrant campus culture. In addition to our graduates’ proven academic excellence and contributions to the world, these traditions also bring positive attention to our university.

A central theme of the exhibit is a time capsule buried on campus in celebration of 10 years of classes at UTSA. Included in the time capsule is a list of five wishes students had for UTSA back in 1983: to become a major university with the facilities of a large university; to provide campus housing to students; to have student union building; to offer doctoral and expanded master’s programs; and to have football and soccer teams. Using our collections and material from other UTSA offices, Schwartz and her team pulled together photographs documenting the achievement of these goals at UTSA well in advance of 2023, when the capsule will be exhumed.

UA 16.01.01 N&I UTSA 10 Birthday Student Party 6-6-83 #1

Students pose around a time capsule, buried in 1983 and set to be exhumed in 2023. UA 16.01.01 N&I UTSA 10 Birthday Student Party 6-6-83 #1 detail.

The exhibit will run until December 12, 2014. Gallery 23 is located on the lower level of the University Center (UC 1.02.23) and is open 11am – 7pm, Monday – Thursday and 11am – 5pm Friday. For more information about the exhibit, including contact information, visit the event calendar page, and the University Center’s Facebook page. For more information on where you can find resources documenting UTSA’s history, view the Library research guide History of UTSA, and check out our digital collections on UTSA History and UTSA Publications.

 

 

 

New Acquisitions for August 2014

September 18, 2014

Manuscript Collections

Additions:

  • MS 103. Opera Guild of San Antonio records, .5 linear feet
  • MS 168. Margaret King Stanley papers, .5 linear feet

Historical Images of Castroville, Texas

September 15, 2014

Castroville is well-known for its old-world charm, complete with picturesque nineteenth century stone structures. Many of the town’s citizens are descendants of the original Alsatian settlers. A few still speak the Alsatian dialect of their ancestors.

Earlier this month, the town of Castroville celebrated the 170th anniversary of its founding. Speakers, at five historic sites, recounted the story of the people from Alsace who arrived at the site of present-day Castroville in September 1844. In addition to the presentations, the Alsatian Dancers of Texas and local bands performed for visitors. There were also numerous booths with arts, crafts, and historical displays.

UTSA Libraries Special Collections was among the exhibitors, showcasing copies of over 100 photographs of Castroville found in our collections. These are some of those images.

 

Laurent Quintle House and Store, circa 1940.  (MS 362:  107-0035)

Laurent Quintle House and Store, circa 1940. (MS 362: 107-0035)

Wagon train pauses on Houston Square, circa 1900.   (MS 362:  096-0537)

Wagon train pauses on Houston Square, circa 1900. (MS 362: 096-0537)

Castroville Brass Band, circa 1915.  (MS 362:  081-0640)

Castroville Brass Band, circa 1915. (MS 362: 081-0640)

Zuercher Millinery in Klappenbach Building, Madrid Street (Houston Square), circa 1900.  (MS 362:  072-0877)

Zuercher Millinery in Klappenbach Building, Madrid Street (Houston Square), circa 1900. (MS 362: 072-0877)

Joseph Courand General Store, Paris and Lorenzo Streets, early 1900s.  (MS 362: 072-0875)

Joseph Courand General Store, Paris and Lorenzo Streets, early 1900s. (MS 362: 072-0875)

Tarde Hotel, Fiorella Street, circa 1940.  (MS 362:  107-0027)

Tarde Hotel, Fiorella Street, circa 1940. (MS 362: 107-0027)

Ed Tschirhart (left) and Andy Halberdier, Tschirhart Blacksmith Shop, Paris Street (Houston Square), ca. 1905.  (MS 362: 96-542).

Ed Tschirhart (left) and Andy Halberdier, Tschirhart Blacksmith Shop, Paris Street (Houston Square), ca. 1905. (MS 362: 96-542)

Tondre Saloon, early 1900s.  (MS 362:  077-0046)

Tondre Saloon, early 1900s. (MS 362: 077-0046)

Pierre Francois Pingenot House, Petersburg Street, circa 1940  (MS362:  107-0045)

Pierre Francois Pingenot House, Petersburg Street, circa 1940 (MS362: 107-0045)

Roberta and Lucy Hopp outside the Kieser-Pingenot House, Madrid Street, 1897.  (MS 362:  109-0762)

Roberta and Lucy Hopp outside the Kieser-Pingenot House, Madrid Street, 1897. (MS 362: 109-0762)

Philip Wernette Saloon, Fiorella and London Streets, 1909.  (MS 362:  109-0750)

Philip Wernette Saloon, Fiorella and London Streets, 1909. (MS 362: 109-0750)

Office of Anton Haller, justice of the Peace, in the Joseph Carle House and Store Building, Madrid Street (Houston Square), circa 1940.  (MS 362:  107-0037)

Office of Anton Haller, justice of the Peace, in the Joseph Carle House and Store Building, Madrid Street (Houston Square), circa 1940. (MS 362: 107-0037)

Moye Military School, London Street, early 1940s.  (MS 355:  Z-0310-A-2)

Moye Military School, London Street, early 1940s. (MS 355: Z-0310-A-2)

St. Louis Catholic Church, with fresco work by Fred Donecker and son, 1902.  (MS 362:  88-144)

St. Louis Catholic Church, with fresco work by Fred Donecker and son, 1902. (MS 362: 88-144)

St. Louis Catholic Church on Houston Square, 1951.  (MS 359: L-4106-A)

St. Louis Catholic Church on Houston Square, 1951. (MS 359: L-4106-A)

 

 

Special Collections Student Clerk Position at HemisFair Park-ITC Campus

September 9, 2014

UTSA Libraries Special Collections is seeking one student clerk to assist with department operations at the HemisFair Park/ITC Campus. Interested students may apply by submitting a resume and cover letter to specialcollections@utsa.edu.


Job Title: Student Clerk

Job Description: With training from the Photo Curator and the University Archivist, carry out basic tasks in the Special Collections department. Activities may include paging archival boxes, photocopying, and re-shelving materials; scanning and entering basic metadata for digital collections; re-housing and creating inventories of collections; and other duties as determined.

Qualifications: Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Some lifting required. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold needed. Familiarity with Excel, scanners and image editing software a plus.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours Tuesday-Thursday.

 Hours per Week: 15

Wage: $7.50/hr.

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter to specialcollections@utsa.edu. If you have questions regarding the position, please contact Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu.

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