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New Acquisitions for November 2014

December 18, 2014

Manuscript Collections

Nacho Guarache strip from January 6, 1987 , MS 429

January 6, 1987 cartoon, MS 429

New:

  • MS 429. Leo Garza Political Cartoon collection, 7 linear feet of Nacho Guarache cartoons

Additions:

  • MS 83. Planned Parenthood of San Antonio and South Central Texas Records, .5 linear feet of annual audits, reports, publications, and assorted materials.
  • MS 22.  Women’s Overseas Service League records, .5 linear feet of materials collected by Edith Stout.
  • MS 331. San Antonio River Authority records, 17 linear feet of SACIP Mission Reach project files, real estate files, and engineering photographs.
  • MS 31. San Antonio Fair, Inc., .5 linear feet of materials from Alfred G. Vazquez, a member of the Executive Committee for HemisFair ’68.

University Archives

New:

  • UA 04.03.01.02 UTSA. Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs. Vice Provost Downtown Campus, one digitized copy of a scrapbook of photos from downtown campus opening, loaned from Vice Provost Jesse Zapata.

Rare Books: 7 Titles [November Title List]

Highlight:roof

IN THE ROOF OF YOUR CHOICE CHARM AND DURABILITY. John-Manville Corp. 1923. 3 pg. double foldout, color illus of 10 homes with the many syles and many colors of their roofing. [description provided by book seller]

Santa Claus Comes to San Antonio

December 15, 2014

 

Men impersonating Santa Claus have thrilled children in San Antonio for well over a hundred years. The San Antonio Daily Express, December 6, 1901, describes an early visit–perhaps the first—when Santa Claus came as a guest of Joske Brother’s Department Store. Thousands of his fans crowded around the store, creating traffic jams along Commerce and Alamo Streets. Finally, a curtain was lifted from a display window revealing Santa Claus and a large Christmas tree surrounded by a large assemblage of toys.   The article notes that “his reception was as brilliant and his success as pronounced as that of a Napoleon returning from a conquest.”

By the 1920s, Santa Claus was making annual visits to the city. One of those visits is documented in articles in The San Antonio Light in early December 1928. There was a welcoming ceremony for him, including a speech by Mayor C.M. Chambers and the presentation of the keys to Alamo Plaza. Santa then proceeded to a special area set up in front of the entrance to the Alamo. It included an igloo for him and a pen for his reindeer. Here, Santa demonstrated toy-making and gave samples of this work to the children.

These are some of the images of Santa Claus from The San Antonio Light Photograph Collection (MS 359) and San Antonio Express-News Photograph Collection (MS 360).  They illustrate the expanded role of Santa Claus from a department store toymaker, to also a benevolent character involved with charitable and philanthropic activities. The photographs also show the evolution of the Santa Claus suit from the homemade versions to the factory-made one that has become his standard attire.

 

Santa Claus poses in the alley beside the San Antonio Light Building on East Travis Street, 1926.  The photograph was published as an altered image showing Santa Claus climbing out of an amphibious aircraft that brought him from the North Pole to San Antonio.  (MS 359: L-0720-N)

Santa Claus poses in the alley beside the San Antonio Light Building on East Travis Street, 1926. The photograph was published as an altered image showing Santa Claus climbing out of the amphibious aircraft that brought him from the North Pole to San Antonio.  Jack Specht/The San Antonio Light (MS 359: L-0720-N)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Santa Claus hands Raymond Jones, manager of the Princess Theater, a copy of the movie “Santa Claus,” 1926.  The film, documenting Santa’s activities at the North Pole from one Christmas to the next, was featured daily for one week at the theater on Houston Street.  (MS 359: L-0720-I)

Santa Claus hands Raymond Jones, manager of the Princess Theater, a copy of the movie “Santa Claus,” 1926.  The film, documenting Santa’s activities at the North Pole from one Christmas to the next, was featured daily for a week at the theater on Houston Street.  Jack Specht/The San Antonio Light  (MS 359: L-0720-I)

Santa Claus stands outside his igloo in front of the Alamo, 1928.  His reindeer are partly visible on far right.  (MS 359: L-0720-M)

Santa Claus stands outside his igloo in front of the Alamo, 1928.  His reindeer are partly visible on far right.  Jack Specht/The San Antonio Light  (MS 359: L-0720-M)

Santa Claus pauses from his toy-making demonstration to visit with Roger Martin and Eloise Jones, 1928.  (MS 359: L-0720-A)

Santa Claus pauses from his toy-making demonstration to visit with Roger Martin and Eloise Jones, 1928.  Jack Specht/The San Antonio Light  (MS 359: L-0720-A)

Santa Claus joins Jack White (left), manager of Plaza Hotel, and Fire Chief J.G. Sarran as they plan an event to acquire toys to distribute to needy children on Christmas Day, 1935.  (MS 359: L-0845-C)

Santa Claus joins Jack White (left), manager of Plaza Hotel, and Fire Chief J.G. Sarran as they plan an event to acquire toys to distribute to needy children on Christmas Day, 1935.  (MS 359: L-0845-C)

Charles Malven and Mary Reams are frightened of Santa Claus (W.D. Taylor) and his ten-gallon hat, 1947.  (MS 359: L-3494-A)

Charles Malven and Mary Reams appear to be frightened of Santa Claus (W.D. Taylor) and his ten-gallon hat, 1947.  Mel Koenning/The San Antonio Light  (MS 359: L-3494-A)

Santa Claus (Floyd Arnold) takes a break from his job in a department store, 1948.  (MS 359: L-3681-C)

Santa Claus (Floyd Arnold) takes a break from his duties in a department store, 1948.  (MS 359: L-3681-C)

Harry Jersig, president of Lone Star Brewing Company, and Santa Claus (Jimmy Faulkner) with Christmas gifts to be distributed at the annual dinner for the local newsboys, 1948.  (MS 359: L-3628-F)

Harry Jersig, president of Lone Star Brewing Company, and Santa Claus (Jimmy Faulkner) with Christmas gifts to be distributed at the annual dinner for the local newsboys, 1948.  (MS 359: L-3628-F)

Santa Claus listens to Christmas wishes in a suburban neighborhood, 1988.  (MS 359: L-7172-45-23)

Santa Claus listens to Christmas wishes in a suburban neighborhood, 1988.  Villafuerte/The San Antonio Light  (MS 359: L-7172-45-23)

Santa Claus visits with a Blue Santa, a member of the San Antonio Police Department program that distributes Christmas gifts to needy children, 1990.  (MS 359: L-3681-C)

The Routers Car Club Santa Claus visits with Blue Santa, from the San Antonio Police Department program that distributes Christmas gifts to needy children, 1990.  (MS 359: L-3681-C)

Santa Claus and Pancho Claus bring gifts for students from Storm Elementary School, 1989.  (MS 360: EN1989-12-15-24)

Santa Claus and Pancho Claus bring gifts for students from Storm Elementary School, 1989.  Joe Barrera, Jr./San Antonio Express-News  (MS 360: EN1989-12-15-24)

Santa Claus arrives at East Side Multi-Service Center for “Santa’s Soul Day,” a Christmas event for disadvantaged children, 1987.  (MS 360: EN1989-12-15-24)

Santa Claus arrives at East Side Multi-Service Center for “Santa’s Soul Day,” a Christmas event for disadvantaged children, 1987.  John Davenport/San Antonio Express-News  (MS 360: EN1989-12-15-24)

Santa Claus (Juan Esparza) distributes gifts on Christmas morning at La Villita, 1990.  (MS 360: EN1990-12-25-21)

Santa Claus (Juan Esparza) distributes gifts on Christmas morning at La Villita, 1990.  (MS 360: EN1990-12-25-21)

 

Charro Claus and the Tejas Kid

December 10, 2014
Charro Claus and the Tejas Kid book cover

Charro Claus and the Tejas Kid book cover

Xavier Garza is an author, artist, storyteller and teacher whose work focuses primarily on his experiences growing up in the small Rio Grande Valley border town of Rio Grande City.  Garza has stated that all of his books are based, one way or another, on childhood memories. He recalls his abuela (grandmother) telling him stories while she made tortillas around the stove and has held on to these cultural memories that serve as inspiration for his work as an author and an artist. In 2009, Special Collections acquired a collection of materials from Garza, including typescript manuscripts, pencil and ink sketches, acrylic paintings and newspaper and magazine articles.

For the upcoming holidays, Special Collections would like to highlight Charro Claus and the Tejas Kid.  From a 2008 interview Garza explains that “Charro Claus and the Tejas Kid is basically the story of Santa’s Mexican cousin. He is helped by his nephew Vincent to deliver presents to each and every child that lives on both sides of the US/Mexico border.”

The publisher, Cinco Punto Press, describes the book as follows:

Let’s welcome Santa’s newest helper: his cousin Pancho, a farmer living down in South Texas who is so smart he speaks Spanish and English. Back in the day, Pancho was a mariachi singer with a whole lot of style and a fancy sombrero. But as the years passed, Pancho got, well, a little older and a little wider all around. Then one night his primo Santa Claus showed up. Santa needed some help! Pancho volunteered. And then, poof, Santa transformed Pancho into the resplendent Charro Claus with his incredibly Flying Burritos. And Charro Claus, it turns out, even had his own surprise elf—his nephew Vincent!

All Christmas Eve, Vincent and Pancho deliver toys to the boys and girls on the border. Neither rain, cloudy skies, wire fences nor concrete walls keep them from covering every inch of their newly assigned territory. And they don’t forget a single town or city. How could they? The border is their home.

The process to create and publish Charro Claus and the Tejas Kid took about two years to complete. Garza spent about 10 months developing the story together with Lee Byrd at Cinco Puntos Press and then another 7 months to get all the illustrations pulled together.  The materials donated to UTSA include quite a few early sketches and illustrations from the book – take a look:

 

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Sources:

  • Cinco Punto Press: http://www.cincopuntos.com/products_detail.sstg?id=144
  • Interview with Author/Illustrator Xavier Garza. La Bloga. http://labloga.blogspot.com/2008/12/interview-with-authorillustrator-xavier.html
  • Interview with Author Xavier Garza. Worlds of Words: http://wowlit.org/blog/2009/11/02/interview-with-author-xavier-garza/
  • Xavier Garza – Artist-Author-Storyteller in Residence at UTPA Library June 29-30. Bronc Notes UTPA: http://www.utpa.edu/broncnotes/bulletin.cfm?ID=6727

Uvalde: From Agriculture to Asphalt

December 1, 2014

Over the past several months, we have drawn on UTSA’s rare books collection to pay visits to several of the small towns surrounding San Antonio: New Braunfels, Fredericksburg, Boerne, Kerrville, Seguin, and Castroville. We conclude this series today with the town of Uvalde, 83 miles west of San Antonio.

Frontispiece. The Life and Diary of Reading W. Black: A History of Early Uvalde (1934) by Ike Moore. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Frontispiece. The Life and Diary of Reading W. Black: A History of Early Uvalde (1934) by Ike Moore. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Two immigrants from New Jersey — Reading Wood Black and Nathan L. Stratton — established a ranch near the head of Leona River in the early 1850s and in 1855, a town called Encina was laid out near the site. When Uvalde County was organized just one year later, the town became the county seat and was renamed after Juan de Ugalde, one-time governor of the province of San Francisco de Coahuila of New Spain.

Black, who continued to be a prominent citizen of the area, was elected county commissioner in 1856. He opposed secession, but remained in Uvalde during the early years of the Civil War. After the murder of Union prisoners by Confederate militiamen in 1862, Black chose to relocate to Mexico until the end of the War. Upon his return to Uvalde, he resumed his place in the community and was elected to the state congress. However, in 1867, he was murdered by former friend G. W. Wall.  Black’s diary was edited and published in 1934 by Ike Moore as The Life and Diary of Reading W. Black. 

Illustration. Oldtimers: Their Own Stories (1939) by  Florence Fenley. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Photograph of Mary Nunn Black. Oldtimers: Their Own Stories (1939) by Florence Fenley. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Black’s daughter Mary Black Nunn is one of about 50 Uvalde residents featured in Florence Fenley’s 1939 Oldtimers: Their Own Stories. Mary was outside playing with her siblings when Wall entered her father’s store and she recalls running inside when she heard her mother scream after her father was shot. Following her father’s death, Mary was sent East to live with his relatives during her teenage years. She learned to navigate hoop skirts and rules of etiquette, but longed for the freedom of her Texas youth and later returned to Uvalde, where she married childhood playmate George Thomas Nunn.

As with many small Texas towns, the construction of railways brought tighter connections to the outside world and opportunities for economic development. In 1881, Uvalde became a shipping point on the Galveston, Harrisburg, and San Antonio Railway and in 1911, the Crystal City and Uvalde Railroad reached Crystal City.

Although primarily an agricultural and ranching community,  Uvalde has also been home to certain industries, including honey production and asphalt mining. Ten Times Around the World by Uvalde Rock Asphalt Company explains that when rock asphalt first came into use in the 1870s, it was imported from Europe, but its expense (and the events of WWI) prevented that from being a satisfactory long-term solution. As an alternative, this 1923 promotional pamphlet urges readers to consider Uvalde rock asphalt, quoting praise from  W. R. Hughes of Standard Engineering (Dallas, TX):

The only deposit of limestone rock asphalt of any consequence that has been developed in the United States is located in Uvalde County, Texas, about seven miles south from Cline station on the Southern Pacific Railroad. The material from this deposit is very much like that from some of the European deposits. However, the limestone is harder and the bitumen has a higher ductility.

Map. Ten Times Around the World (1923) by Uvalde Rock Asphalt. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

Map of asphalt streets in San Antonio. Ten Times Around the World (1923) by Uvalde Rock Asphalt. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

The unique landscape along the Frio River has long held a strong attraction for visitors to the area and in the 1920s, the Magers family chose to open part of their land for camping. The Civilian Conservation Corps was later enlisted to construct park facilities and the completed park was donated to the state and opened to visitors in 1941. It is named for John Nance Garner, an Uvalde native and Vice President to Franklin D. Roosevelt from 1933-1941. Both the park (under construction) and Garner’s home can be seen in The Century in Southwest Texas (1937), edited by Arthur J. Simpson.

 


Additional Sources

Thomas W. Cutrer, “BLACK, READING WOOD,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fbl04), accessed November 25, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

Garner State Park, (http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/state-parks/garner/park_history) accessed November 25, 2014. Published by the Texas Parks & Wildlife Department.

Ruben E. Ochoa, “GARNER STATE PARK,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/gkg05), accessed November 25, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

Freida R. Rogers, “UVALDE, TX,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/heu03), accessed October 28, 2014. Uploaded on June 15, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

 

Now online: UTSA student recruitment videos from the Office of Admissions

November 24, 2014

Earlier this year Special Collections received a transfer of VHS cassette tapes from the Office of Admissions for inclusion in the University Archives. We selected two of these cassette tapes, dated 1988 and 1994, to digitize and make available online. To watch the videos, click on the hyperlinked titles or view them in the YouTube viewers below.

Recruitment videos on VHS cassettes, received from the Office of Admissions, UA 19.03.01.

Recruitment videos on VHS cassettes, received from the Office of Admissions, UA 19.03.01.

Staff at the Office of Admissions explained that these videos were likely produced by the News and Information Office, which later became the Office of University Communications, to showcase UTSA. These videos were shown to groups visiting campus and brought to regional high schools to be shown to prospective students and their counselors.

The University of Texas at San Antonio Office of Admissions: Student Life Admissions Recruitment Video 1988

The 1988 video (20:31 runtime) is the longest and most in-depth. The video features testimonials from students and staff regarding academics and campus life at UTSA. There is a montage of scenes around campus, including classrooms and instruction, housing, athletics, and events on campus (including footage of a 1988 version of the roadrunner mascot dancing under the Sombrilla), all set to stimulating piano music. Staff from offices such as Admissions, Student Information and Retention, Financial Aid, Housing, and Student Activities & the University Center offer introductions to their programs and discuss their student support agendas. Of particular interest is a full demonstration of UTSA’s Telephone Registration System, a technological marvel in 1988 that saved time for students and “[streamlined] the registration system” in the days before the Internet. The video also includes aerials of main campus and footage of attractions in San Antonio.

The University of Texas at San Antonio Office of Admissions: Recruitment Video 1994

The 1994 video (7:34 runtime) features a narrator, who gives an overview of UTSA, accompanied by energetic electronic music and mesmerizing screen transitions. This shorter video focuses on UTSA’s academic offerings, displaying footage of engaged students and faculty, as well as equipment and facilities available to students. The second part of the video provides footage of “life outside of the classroom,” including housing, student organizations, and athletics—all available to help the UTSA student “grow as an individual.” The latter half of the video focuses on the student support services UTSA offers, finished with an invitation to become a part of UTSA’s vision of “shaping the future for a better tomorrow.”

Special Collections is pleased to provide online access to these videos about UTSA. If you have additional information about the videos you would like to share we welcome your comments.

 

New Acquisitions for October 2014

November 20, 2014

Manuscript Collections

Gene Elder sketchbook, MS 428

Gene Elder sketchbook, MS 428

New:

  • MS 428 Elder (Gene) Papers, approximately eight linear feet comprised of 18 journals containing original art by Elder and others, correspondence, journal entries, event fliers, photographs, and ephemera

University Archives

Additions:

  • UA 01.03 UTSA. University Archives Vertical file, .01 linear feet comprised of 1 issue of September 1975 Mesquite Monthly
  • UA 14.01 UTSA. Center for Archaeological Research Publications Collection, 12 PDFs of CAR reports

Rare Books: 22 Titles [October Title List]

Highlights:

an-tr0078Trucker King (complete set of three vols. of the “San Antonio” Series of Trucker King)

Falling loosely within the genre of Western Adventure, the Trucker King serial novels of the 1980s and 1990s follow the adventures of trucker Rocky Robson and friend T.O. Bucker with their truck (nicknamed “Buffalo”) against a background of intrigues within a large shipping company run by Robson’s former father-in-law Henry B. Rockford. Totes-Fiesta in San Antonio, along with Durchbruch nach San Antonio, and San Antonio Story, form a “San Antonio” triad within the German-language Trucker King franchise.

For more Trucker King titles (with cover illustrations), see: http://www.romanhefte-info.de/d_weitere_truckerking_000.html

Business and Professional Women’s Foundation records at UTSA

November 17, 2014
BPW 22nd Annual Luncheon Invitation, 1941, BPW-SA, MS 7

BPW 22nd Annual Luncheon Invitation, 1941, BPW SA, MS 7

The Business and Professional Women’s Foundation was the first foundation dedicated to conducting research and providing information solely about working women. Since then, they have partnered with employers to create successful workplaces that embrace and practice diversity, equity and work-life balance convening employers, working women and policymakers to promote workplace change.

Special Collections is honored to maintain the records of 5 local chapters of this organization, including:

Business and Professional Women’s Club of A La Nueva Inc.

The collection is made up of material from the A La Nueva and State groups and spans the years 1997-2009, it includes correspondence, meeting minutes, agendas, by-laws, updates, several newsletters, magazines, clippings, monthly, mid-year, and annual reports; annual budgets, yearbooks, proclamations, membership applications, list, and award submissions materials.

Scrapbook newsclipping, October 4, 1941, BPW-SA, MS 7

Scrapbook newsclipping, October 4, 1941, BPW SA, MS 7

North Alamo City Business and Professional Women’s Club

The North Alamo City Business and Professional Women’s Club was established in 1968, an official chartered club of the Texas Federation of Business and Professional Women and National Federation of Business and Professional Women. The club began with 22 members. Among the club’s achievements was the establishment of their Career Awareness Program, the first inaugurated by a state club. Additionally, the club presented annual scholarships and hosted annual educational seminars for women. The collection spans the years 1953 through 1992 and documents the establishment, functions, and district-wide, statewide, national, and international involvement of the North Alamo City Business and Professional Women’s Club. The bulk of the collection is comprised of materials generated by the Texas and National Federations of Business and Professional Women, including newsletters, conference materials, and general procedural guides and manuals.

National Business Women, September 1951, BPW North Alamo City, MS 55

National Business Women, September 1951, BPW North Alamo City, MS 55

Business and Professional Women’s Club of San Antonio

The Business and Professional Women’s Club of San Antonio was organized on May 23, 1923 to offer professional women an opportunity to gather to promote their interests. The club’s main interests have been providing women with business opportunities, promoting opportunities for women in the professions and encouraging young women to enter the professions. Records consist of minutes, reports, bulletins, membership applications, yearbooks, correspondence, financial records, legal documents, scrapbooks, programs and photographic materials that document the structure, activities, interests, events and business transactions of the Club. The best overview of Club activities on a daily basis can be found in the History Books and Bulletins.

Scrapbook newsclipping

Scrapbook excerpt, August 14, 1932, BPW SA, MS 7

Business and Professional Women’s Club of Texas. District 13

The mission of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs is to achieve equality for all women in the workplace through advocacy, education, and information. The bulk of the collection is comprised of correspondence, financial records, handbooks, conference planning materials and minutes.

Mission City Business and Professional Women’s Club

Mission City Business and Professional Women’s Club offers a nurturing and supportive environment to working women as they travel their career paths. They offer educational resources and programs for both our members and our community so that they may continue to expand the frontiers of justice and equality for all. Mission City Business and Professional Women’s Club records Primarily consists of correspondence, minutes, membership materials and newsletters.

Source:

  • Business and Professional Women’s Foundation: About – http://bpwfoundation.org/index.php/about/
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