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Now online: UTSA student recruitment videos from the Office of Admissions

November 24, 2014

Earlier this year Special Collections received a transfer of VHS cassette tapes from the Office of Admissions for inclusion in the University Archives. We selected two of these cassette tapes, dated 1988 and 1994, to digitize and make available online. To watch the videos, click on the hyperlinked titles or view them in the YouTube viewers below.

Recruitment videos on VHS cassettes, received from the Office of Admissions, UA 19.03.01.

Recruitment videos on VHS cassettes, received from the Office of Admissions, UA 19.03.01.

Staff at the Office of Admissions explained that these videos were likely produced by the News and Information Office, which later became the Office of University Communications, to showcase UTSA. These videos were shown to groups visiting campus and brought to regional high schools to be shown to prospective students and their counselors.

The University of Texas at San Antonio Office of Admissions: Student Life Admissions Recruitment Video 1988

The 1988 video (20:31 runtime) is the longest and most in-depth. The video features testimonials from students and staff regarding academics and campus life at UTSA. There is a montage of scenes around campus, including classrooms and instruction, housing, athletics, and events on campus (including footage of a 1988 version of the roadrunner mascot dancing under the Sombrilla), all set to stimulating piano music. Staff from offices such as Admissions, Student Information and Retention, Financial Aid, Housing, and Student Activities & the University Center offer introductions to their programs and discuss their student support agendas. Of particular interest is a full demonstration of UTSA’s Telephone Registration System, a technological marvel in 1988 that saved time for students and “[streamlined] the registration system” in the days before the Internet. The video also includes aerials of main campus and footage of attractions in San Antonio.

The University of Texas at San Antonio Office of Admissions: Recruitment Video 1994

The 1994 video (7:34 runtime) features a narrator, who gives an overview of UTSA, accompanied by energetic electronic music and mesmerizing screen transitions. This shorter video focuses on UTSA’s academic offerings, displaying footage of engaged students and faculty, as well as equipment and facilities available to students. The second part of the video provides footage of “life outside of the classroom,” including housing, student organizations, and athletics—all available to help the UTSA student “grow as an individual.” The latter half of the video focuses on the student support services UTSA offers, finished with an invitation to become a part of UTSA’s vision of “shaping the future for a better tomorrow.”

Special Collections is pleased to provide online access to these videos about UTSA. If you have additional information about the videos you would like to share we welcome your comments.

 

New Acquisitions for October 2014

November 20, 2014

Manuscript Collections

Gene Elder sketchbook, MS 428

Gene Elder sketchbook, MS 428

New:

  • MS 428 Elder (Gene) Papers, approximately eight linear feet comprised of 18 journals containing original art by Elder and others, correspondence, journal entries, event fliers, photographs, and ephemera

University Archives

Additions:

  • UA 01.03 UTSA. University Archives Vertical file, .01 linear feet comprised of 1 issue of September 1975 Mesquite Monthly
  • UA 14.01 UTSA. Center for Archaeological Research Publications Collection, 12 PDFs of CAR reports

Rare Books: 22 Titles [October Title List]

Highlights:

an-tr0078Trucker King (complete set of three vols. of the “San Antonio” Series of Trucker King)

Falling loosely within the genre of Western Adventure, the Trucker King serial novels of the 1980s and 1990s follow the adventures of trucker Rocky Robson and friend T.O. Bucker with their truck (nicknamed “Buffalo”) against a background of intrigues within a large shipping company run by Robson’s former father-in-law Henry B. Rockford. Totes-Fiesta in San Antonio, along with Durchbruch nach San Antonio, and San Antonio Story, form a “San Antonio” triad within the German-language Trucker King franchise.

For more Trucker King titles (with cover illustrations), see: http://www.romanhefte-info.de/d_weitere_truckerking_000.html

Business and Professional Women’s Foundation records at UTSA

November 17, 2014
BPW 22nd Annual Luncheon Invitation, 1941, BPW-SA, MS 7

BPW 22nd Annual Luncheon Invitation, 1941, BPW SA, MS 7

The Business and Professional Women’s Foundation was the first foundation dedicated to conducting research and providing information solely about working women. Since then, they have partnered with employers to create successful workplaces that embrace and practice diversity, equity and work-life balance convening employers, working women and policymakers to promote workplace change.

Special Collections is honored to maintain the records of 5 local chapters of this organization, including:

Business and Professional Women’s Club of A La Nueva Inc.

The collection is made up of material from the A La Nueva and State groups and spans the years 1997-2009, it includes correspondence, meeting minutes, agendas, by-laws, updates, several newsletters, magazines, clippings, monthly, mid-year, and annual reports; annual budgets, yearbooks, proclamations, membership applications, list, and award submissions materials.

Scrapbook newsclipping, October 4, 1941, BPW-SA, MS 7

Scrapbook newsclipping, October 4, 1941, BPW SA, MS 7

North Alamo City Business and Professional Women’s Club

The North Alamo City Business and Professional Women’s Club was established in 1968, an official chartered club of the Texas Federation of Business and Professional Women and National Federation of Business and Professional Women. The club began with 22 members. Among the club’s achievements was the establishment of their Career Awareness Program, the first inaugurated by a state club. Additionally, the club presented annual scholarships and hosted annual educational seminars for women. The collection spans the years 1953 through 1992 and documents the establishment, functions, and district-wide, statewide, national, and international involvement of the North Alamo City Business and Professional Women’s Club. The bulk of the collection is comprised of materials generated by the Texas and National Federations of Business and Professional Women, including newsletters, conference materials, and general procedural guides and manuals.

National Business Women, September 1951, BPW North Alamo City, MS 55

National Business Women, September 1951, BPW North Alamo City, MS 55

Business and Professional Women’s Club of San Antonio

The Business and Professional Women’s Club of San Antonio was organized on May 23, 1923 to offer professional women an opportunity to gather to promote their interests. The club’s main interests have been providing women with business opportunities, promoting opportunities for women in the professions and encouraging young women to enter the professions. Records consist of minutes, reports, bulletins, membership applications, yearbooks, correspondence, financial records, legal documents, scrapbooks, programs and photographic materials that document the structure, activities, interests, events and business transactions of the Club. The best overview of Club activities on a daily basis can be found in the History Books and Bulletins.

Scrapbook newsclipping

Scrapbook excerpt, August 14, 1932, BPW SA, MS 7

Business and Professional Women’s Club of Texas. District 13

The mission of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs is to achieve equality for all women in the workplace through advocacy, education, and information. The bulk of the collection is comprised of correspondence, financial records, handbooks, conference planning materials and minutes.

Mission City Business and Professional Women’s Club

Mission City Business and Professional Women’s Club offers a nurturing and supportive environment to working women as they travel their career paths. They offer educational resources and programs for both our members and our community so that they may continue to expand the frontiers of justice and equality for all. Mission City Business and Professional Women’s Club records Primarily consists of correspondence, minutes, membership materials and newsletters.

Source:

  • Business and Professional Women’s Foundation: About – http://bpwfoundation.org/index.php/about/

Veterans Day in San Antonio

November 11, 2014

Veterans Day observances this year included the annual Veterans Parade downtown, a wreath-laying ceremony at the Alamo, programs at both national cemeteries, and a week of events at the University of Texas at San Antonio http://utsa.edu/today/2014/11/veteransday14.html. We use the occasion to look back at previous commemorations of Veterans Day (known as “Armistice Day” until 1954).

News accounts describe the first observance, November 11, 1919, as a full day of activities that began after a large crowd assembled in front of the Alamo. At the exact time of the signing of the armistice, bi- planes from Kelly Field suddenly appeared high above the city and gradually circled lower until they dropped flowers as a tribute to those who lost their lives during the War. After the planes retreated, there was a program of speakers and musical selections, followed by a large military and civic parade. Later in the afternoon, there was a football game between the Kelly Field and the YMCA teams. In the evening, there was a band concert in San Pedro Park.

While we do not have any photographs of that first Armistice Day, there are images of subsequent observances in San Antonio. Here are a few examples from the San Antonio Light (MS 359) and San Antonio Express-News (MS 360) collections.

 

Armistice Day Parade turns off Commerce Street to Alamo Street, 1924. (MS 359: L-0018-I)

Armistice Day Parade turns off Commerce Street to Alamo Street, 1924. (MS 359: L-0018-I)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On Armistice Day 1938, C. H. Collins demonstrates how he blew the Alamo Iron Works whistle to notify San Antonio residents of the signing of the Armistice in 1918.   (MS 359: L-1973-H)

C. H. Collins observes the 20th anniversary of the end of World War I by demonstrating how he blew the Alamo Iron Works whistle to notify San Antonio residents of the signing of the armistice, Armistice Day, 1938.  (MS 359: L-1973-H)

A large crowd watches the first Armistice Day parade following the end of World War II, 1945.  (MS 359:  L-3180-C)

A large crowd watches the first Armistice Day parade following the end of World War II, 1945. (MS 359: L-3180-C)

Tanks on Houston Street, Armistice Day, 1946  (MS 359:  L-3312-E)

Tanks on Houston Street, Armistice Day, 1946 (MS 359: L-3312-E)

A captured German V-2 Rocket featured in the Armistice Day Parade of 1946.  (MS 359:  L-3312-H)

A captured German V-2 Rocket is featured in the Armistice Day Parade of 1946. (MS 359: L-3312-H)

John Van Brant, in Spirit of ’76 costume, rides with two veterans in the 1975 Veterans Day Parade  (MS 360:  E-0036-170)

John Van Brant, in Spirit of ’76 costume, rides with two veterans in the 1975 Veterans Day Parade (MS 360: E-0036-170)

Thomas Jefferson High school band on Alamo Plaza, Veterans Day Parade, November 11, 1978  (MS 360:  E-0049-099)

High school band on Alamo Plaza, Veterans Day Parade, November 11, 1978 (MS 360: E-0049-099)

Young spectators at Veteran’s Day Parade, 1983  (MS 360:  E-0194-028-02)

Young spectators at Veteran’s Day Parade, 1983 (MS 360: E-0194-028-02)

Veteran’s Day Parade on Alamo Plaza, 1985  (MS 360:  E-321-097-10)

Veteran’s Day Parade, 1985 (MS 360: E-321-097-10)

Vietnam veterans in 1985 parade.   (MS 360:  E-1985-11-11-3)

Vietnam veterans in 1985 parade. (MS 360: E-1985-11-11-3)

Veteran’s Day Ceremony at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery, 1989.  (MS 359:  L-7272-26-32)

Veteran’s Day Ceremony at Fort Sam Houston National Cemetery, 1989. (MS 359: L-7272-26-32)

Miles Wasson (left) visits with another World War I veteran at Fort Sam Houston ceremony, 1989.  (MS 359:  L-7272-26-25)

Miles Wasson (left) visits with a fellow World War I veteran at the Fort Sam Houston ceremony, 1989. (MS 359: L-7272-26-25)

Position Opening: Student Clerk to scan SRT/KSO Mexican Manuscript Collection

November 6, 2014
Bulla de plenissima. : Indulgencia en favor y ayuda de la animas de los difuntos

Bulla de plenissima. : Indulgencia en favor y ayuda de la animas de los difuntos. SRT/KSO Mexican Manuscript Collection. UTSA Libraries Special Collections.

UTSA Libraries Special Collections is seeking a student clerk to assist with digitization of the Sons of the Republic of Texas Kathryn Stoner O’Connor Mexican Manuscript Collection.

The Kathryn Stoner O’Connor Mexican Manuscript Collection, collected by the Sons of the Republic of Texas, is made up of printed and manuscript documents, periodicals, pamphlets, and broadsides, predominantly written in Spanish, and ranging in date from the 16th through the 20th centuries. The collection includes government documents, financial records, legal petitions, political and ecclesiastical decrees, wills and legal testaments, and personal and business letters. A broad array of topics is covered in the collection, including information on government, politics, finances, work, religion, social status, marriage and family, and numerous other subjects of social and historical interest.

 

Job Title: Student Clerk

Job Description: With training from Department Head, Digital Archivist, and Rare Books Librarian, the student will carry out tasks relating to digitization. Activities may include paging and re-shelving, scanning, metadata editing, uploading digital objects, and other duties as determined.

Qualifications: Graduate student preferred. May consider undergraduates with library or museum experience. Strong attention to detail and willingness to perform repetitive tasks. Familiarity with scanners and image editing software. Willingness and ability to work in conditions with occasional exposure to dust and mold. Spanish language literacy preferred.

Work Schedule: Flexible during office hours, Mon-Fri.

 Hours per Week: 9 – 19

Wage: $8.00/hr

How to Apply: Submit resume and cover letter to specialcollections@utsa.edu. If you have questions regarding the position, please contact Special Collections at specialcollections@utsa.edu.

Castroville: An Alsatian Settlement on the Texas Frontier

November 3, 2014
Frontispiece. Castro-ville and Henry Castro Empresario(1934 by Julia Nott-Waugh

Frontispiece. Castro-ville and Henry Castro Empresario(1934 by Julia Nott-Waugh

Castroville was founded by empresario Henri Castro in 1842. Castro’s early life history is described in Julia Nott Waugh’s Castro-ville and Henry Castro Empresario. Born in 1786 to a Jewish Spanish-Portuguese family in St. Esprit, France. Castro came to the United States in 1827 as Consul for the Kingdom of Naples at Providence, Rhode Island, where he took an oath of U.S. Citizenship. His business interests straddled both continents in the following decades, and in the early 1840s, he traveled to Texas. Here, he developed the colonization project that led to Castroville’s founding.

Castro’s agreement with the government of the Republic of Texas, as recounted in Henry Castro and His Homestead (1978) by Cornelia E. Crook, required that the colonization project be completed within three years, lest he forfeit all of the matching grants promised to assist the effort. Castro arranged for immigrants – mostly Catholic Alsatian farmers – to be transported to San Antonio in 1844, from where he accompanied them to the site of present-day Castroville, twenty-five miles west of San Antonio. Unfortunately, Castro had not seen the site for himself prior to arriving with the settlers and was dismayed to find no reliable source of water on the grant. He was, however, able to make arrangements with John McMullen to permit his Castro’s settlers to establish homes on McMullen’s Grant.

The Story of Castroville (1961) by Ruth Curry Lawler

The Story of Castroville (1961) by Ruth Curry Lawler

Cornelia English Crook’s 1988 Henry Castro: A study of Early Colonization in Texas takes note of the many challenges facing Castro’s colony in its early years, including raids from surrounding Indian tribes, drought and crop-consuming locusts in 1848, and a cholera epidemic in 1849. Despite these hardships, the settlers slowly built a thriving community. By the early 1850s, it possessed two churches (Catholic and Lutheran), three stores, a brewery, and a gristmill. The town had also become the county seat of Medina County in 1848 and a courthouse was completed in 1855.The town’s architecture had a European cast, with ground floors of stone and second floors with vertical timber. Like Kerrville, Castroville was located in an area rich in cypress trees, which were logged heavily for shingle-making.

Customs, as well as architectural styles, were brought from the Old World to the New. In The Story of Castroville (1961), Ruth Curry Lawler relates that for many decades, the feast day of the patron saint of St. Louis Catholic Church, was celebrated on August 25th (later, this celebration moved to the Sunday nearest the 25th and was called Home Coming Day). She also notes that, although she was unable to identify the reason behind it, she observed that nearly all weddings in the area were celebrated on Tuesdays, and a unique wedding custom required that the groom gift each altar boy with a piece of silver before entering the Rectory to sign the register.

The Story of Castroville (1961) by Ruth Curry Lawler

The Story of Castroville (1961) by Ruth Curry Lawler

In 1892, the county seat moved to Hondo and residents voted to dis-incorporate their town. Although Castroville remained unincorporated until 1948, the population slowly grew over the course of the 20th century as the community continued to produce corn, oats, wheat, vegetables, and hay. By the 1980s, other businesses included grain processing, farm implement dealers, and a center for applied research in genetics and artificial breeding of livestock.

Those interested in learning more about the history of Castroville and its settlers may also wish to consult Castro’s Colony: Empresario Development in Texas: 1842-1865 (1985) by Bobby D. Weaver or explore the more than one hundred images of Castroville available in UTSA Libraries Digital Collections.


Additional Sources

Ruben E. Ochoa, “CASTROVILLE, TX,” Handbook of Texas Online (http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/hjc05), accessed October 28, 2014. Uploaded on June 12, 2010. Published by the Texas State Historical Association.

Brown and Lane Family Papers: staying connected through correspondence

October 27, 2014

The Brown and Lane Family Papers span the years 1853 through 1992 and include the correspondence of several generations. Correspondence consists of exchanges between family members recalling daily activities, travels, work, relationships, and illness. The close ties between family are evident in the frequency and tone of the letters which were often written daily or weekly when family members were apart and served to keep husbands and wives, parents and children, and siblings emotionally connected when separated geographically. News from loved ones was impatiently anticipated while mail slowly made its way to anxious recipients. Family members were often chastised or apologetic when weeks instead of days passed before responding to a correspondent’s latest offering. Reciprocity was expected and the frequent exchange of letters was part of one’s weekly if not daily to-do list.

Letter from Henry Denison Brown to Jeanie V. Brahan, November 1, 1880

Letter from Henry Denison Brown to Jeanie V. Brahan, November 1, 1880

Henry Denison Brown was one of the most prolific correspondents in the family. When courting his future wife, Jeanie Valliant Brahan, Henry wrote love letters to her daily and grew frantic when she did not hear from her as frequently. All it took was a letter from Jeanie to transform Henry’s day while he was away. Henry married Jeanie in 1881 and they eventually moved to San Antonio where Henry worked as the head teller at Breckenridge Bank. In 1884, Jeanie and Henry had their first child, a daughter Elise Denison Brown. As Elise grew and went off to school, Henry continued his passion for writing letters, corresponding with Elise frequently while she was away at school. Henry often included notes from Martha, Elise’s sister. The affectionate tone of the letters speaks to the strong bonds that existed between father and daughter and connected older and younger sister.

Elise Denison Brown attended the University of Texas at Austin and was the first member of the Iota Chapter of Chi Omega Sorority. While in college, Elise studied Spanish, earning a Master of Arts degree. She put her proficiency in Spanish to good use, working as an interpreter in Mexico City for several years before making her way back home to Texas. Elise turned her attention to entrepreneurial pursuits, becoming one of the first women home builders in San Antonio. Elise and her husband Barton George Lane, Sr. had four children, the eldest Elise Lila Lane and Henry Lane carried on the family tradition of keeping close through letters while living in different parts of the country.

Chi Omega convention at Boulder, Colorado, 1914

Chi Omega convention at Boulder, Colorado, 1914

Postcard showing the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, 1939

Postcard showing the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge, 1939

When Henry moved to the San Francisco Bay Area in the 1930s, he shared details of this new chapter of his life with his sister Elise. Studying accounting and law, Henry was a dedicated student who earned his degree as a Certified Public Accountant. Despite his grueling academic schedule, he found time to keep Elise up to date on his life in the city by the bay. Henry had an apartment on Nob Hill from which he could see the lights of the ferries as they glided from the city to the shores of Marin County. Henry described the city in wonderful detail, proclaiming there was simply no where else on earth as beautiful proclamiing that anyone residing elsewhere was being “gipped.” Henry’s love for the Bay Area never waned; he anchored his life there after marrying Sally Brown who hailed from one of San Francisco’s founding families.

While correspondence forms the foundation of the Brown and Lane Family Papers, other items in the collection include Elise Brown Lane’s Chi Omega materials and financial records. Also in the collection are assorted print materials including two handwritten recipe books which contain favorite recipes and homemade concoctions used to remedy common ailments such as rheumatism. The collection is housed at UTSA Libraries Special Collections on main campus and can be accessed by submitting a Request Access to a Collection Form.

Celery, a cure for Rheumatism in handwritten recipe book, undated

Celery, a cure for Rheumatism in handwritten recipe book, undated

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